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Aldarion Sorcerer-of-Rank | joined 16 June 2004 | 481 posts


Now Reading... posted 17 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I'm not going to spoil anything about tBotNS, but I will say this: keep in mind that Severian is not always telling the truth. There is much, much more to the story that is revealed in the last two volumes that make the entire journey much more than what it seems.

Just thought I'd help out, seeing as Wolfe is one of my favorite authors.

And as for what I'm reading now, I'm starting a re-read of Gabriel García Márquez's Cien años de soledad (yes, in Spanish). One of my all-time favorites. Also am planning a re-read of TDTCB in the next few days, not to mention reading more Márquez, Kathleen Goonan (Light Music), Ian MacLeod (The Light Ages), and Carol Emshwiller (The Mount) - all nominated for this past year's Nebula for Best Novel.

And speaking of which, I did finish reading Elizabeth Moon's Nebula-winning The Speed of Dark, which is about autism and the moralities of "curing" this condition via gene therapy. Although it had it's weak spots (I thought the ending was rushed a bit), as a whole, this is a very moving work and one that deserves its comparison to Daniel Keyes's classic Flowers for Algernon. view post


My thoughts on TWP posted 20 June 2004 in The Warrior ProphetMy thoughts on TWP by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Since I'm very tired from working a graveyard shift and don't want to fool with converting from HTML to BBCode tags, I'll just provide a link to my review I made over at wotmania's Other Fantasy section:

[url:2imytoug]http://www.wotmania.com/fantasymessageboardshowmessage.asp?MessageID=96922[/url:2imytoug]

I will say that I enjoyed it greatly and I just sense that things are about to boil over completely into what should be a very enjoyable mess in TTT. What are the thoughts of others here who've read TWP? view post


My thoughts on TWP posted 20 June 2004 in The Warrior ProphetMy thoughts on TWP by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I'll need to re-read that section before I know for sure (I suspect it's because they are from another planet/world, but I'm unsure right now if their powers are the result of a "science" or something else), but I thought it was interesting to learn that the Scylvendi's Dead God apparently is the No-God. This should be very interesting once TTT is published. view post


Now Reading... posted 25 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I hate to say it, but when I read Martin's A Storm of Swords for the first time in early 2001, I was actually bored by the time I reached the infamous Red Wedding scene. I just found it to be just another event, just another plot device that didn't move me as the reader. Oh, when I re-read the series in 2002, I found the third book to be more enjoyable from a technical standpoint, but I still find SoS to be the weakest in the series so far. But that's just me, I guess, seeing as others have raved about the book and series for a variety of reasons, most of them reasoned out.

And as for current, current readings, I just finished Ian MacLeod's The Light Ages last night and thought the book was as good as advertised. Reminded me of China Miéville's Perdido Street Station in its industrial setting, but MacLeod takes a different approach, using fluid prose to describe the social class antagonisms in a way that reminded me of Charles Dickens's Bleak House and Hard Times. Very highly recommended book to read if you get the chance.

Also, I'm halfway finished with Gene Wolfe's latest story collection, Innocents Aboard, and again I'm amazed with his abilities to create a memorable and disturbing scene with just a few words. As good as Wolfe the novelist is, Wolfe the short story writer may be just as good or even better. view post


wotmania Interview with Scott posted 27 June 2004 in Interviews and Reviewswotmania Interview with Scott by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Scott and I have been working on this interview for the better part of a week now. Hope you guys enjoy the finished product!

[url:3nn83ccj]http://www.wotmania.net/fantasymessageboardshowmessage.asp?MessageID=98054[/url:3nn83ccj] view post


wotmania Interview with Scott posted 27 June 2004 in Interviews and Reviewswotmania Interview with Scott by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Can't wait to see the reactions to some of your responses, especially the bit about Tolkien and the New Weird. Should provide more grist for the debates, yes?

As I said before, it was a real pleasure working on this with you. We'll have to do this again sometime, right? <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> view post


wotmania Interview with Scott posted 27 June 2004 in Interviews and Reviewswotmania Interview with Scott by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

That it might, although some of these questions are just an extension of what I asked him at the Nashville book signing last week. Of the other interviews I've conducted with authors, I must say that this one "clicked" the most, maybe because we got to meet in person before beginning the interview process. Probably helps a lot in terms of the flow of conversation. But to be fair, email interviews are probably the hardest type of interview that an author can do, seeing as pre-prepared questions can really put a crimp into the direction the author and interviewer might want to go with it. What you're reading is actually something like five or six email exchanges that later were edited by Scott and I before being posted. I think that plays a huge role in making an interview "presentable."

But this is just only the perspective of the interviewer. Hopefully Scott will reply back with his perspective. I just know I had a blast doing this and would love to do another in the future. view post


wotmania Interview with Scott posted 28 June 2004 in Interviews and Reviewswotmania Interview with Scott by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

No problem, glad to be of some assistance. Oh, and feel free to call me Larry, if you wish. view post


Ages posted 28 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionAges by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Since I turn 30 in less than three weeks, I thought I'd just go ahead and vote in that category, seeing as it'd be more truthful in the future than voting in the other bracket.

But it'll be interesting to see how many are older than me that visit here. I'm hoping I'll still be in the "spring chicken" category when this is all said and done. <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) --> view post


Ages posted 29 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionAges by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Nice bell curve so far on the ages <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) -->

Hrmm...surely Scott isn't the only person who visits here who's older than me, right? Right?

I think I'm starting to develop gray hairs as we speak <!-- s:P --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_razz.gif" alt=":P" title="Razz" /><!-- s:P --> view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 30 June 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Quote: &quot;Sovin Nai&quot;:1i0uilsn
My god, you guys are windy! I think I'm giving up on this thread...[/quote:1i0uilsn]

I have to agree, even though I didn't post here until now <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) --> And to think I thought I had a basic grounding in philosophy, only to realize that I just received a brief runthrough of the medieval Mysticists before heading straight to the Philosophes and out the door!

But a very interesting series of replies so far. I'm surprised that I can almost comprehend all this. Did grad school stuff actually stick? <!-- s:o --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_surprised.gif" alt=":o" title="Surprised" /><!-- s:o -->

So keep up the good work, fellas, and I'll just continue to lurk and learn. view post


The value of a life posted 01 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionThe value of a life by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

This is a direct result of a conversation I had at work last night with a co-worker, although it is strongly influenced by a dozen years of questioning my attitudes toward this topic.

I'll begin by stating that I am opposed to capital punishment in any situation whatsoever. Last night, a co-worker and I were discussing a 1st degree murder case in Nashville where a woman ran through a police barricade and ended up killing two officers. I mentioned that there was some question as to whether or not she lost control of the car and that the hitting of the officers was incidental to the attempt to break through the barricade. My co-worker argued that because it was the police, special laws apply, including the possibility of imposing the death penalty for any case in which a police officer dies as the result of the criminal committing another felony, such as robbery.

This led to the pending execution of a Memphis criminal, Phillip Workman, who was given the death penalty in 1981 because a police officer died in a shootout after Workman was caught fleeing from a store that he had robbed. The evidence that has come to light seems to indicate that the bullet that killed the officer came from another officer, yet the state has argued successfully so far that due to the circumstances, Workman's death sentence was still valid.

I argued that the application of the death penalty in certain 1st degree murder cases should be replaced with mandatory life without parole, noting not just the famous Stanford statistics of 1 in 7 death penalty cases being overturned completely, but also focusing on the message that it sends when we execute someone 20-30 years after their crime was committed. I suggested that maybe a different approach should be tried, maybe establishing on a larger scale a prison works industry, where the inmates can produce things that can be sold to consumers to create some sort of good out of the bad that they have caused by their deliberate actions.

The co-worker countered with the argument that he, and many other Americans, do not want their tax dollars to go toward the maintenance of these violent offenders. He brought in the Bible as support for the common belief about the legality of the death sentence, despite recent urges from religious leaders (especially the Quakers and now the Catholic Church) to have such sentences commuted to life without parole, on grounds of moral decency.

But his reply brings up a larger question: Just how much value do we grant to a human life? Is there a certain dollar amount that should be placed on a person's contributions (or conversely, on the damage that he/she has caused society)? What does it say about societies that do weigh monetary concerns into the equation of how to treat its citizens, not just the criminals but also those who are deemed "less fortunate?" Are some humans "naturally" going to be "worth more" than others? And bringing it back to the death penalty, what effects does such a sentence have on the average citizens, knowing that such a recourse is available?

Just curious to hear thoughts on this. view post


The value of a life posted 01 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionThe value of a life by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Linda: Welcome, glad to see you around these parts as well! <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D -->

SN: I understand your mixed feelings. Years ago, I too felt much the same. I'm certainly not the type who's going to condemn anyone for arguing that there are merits to capital punishment (in fact, it'll be interesting to see what list of merits that can be drawn up), but over the years, my value system that I've constructed just has led me to conclude that I cannot support such a system, not just because of the possibility of errors in the system, but also because I have seen some adverse effects in the average populace. When it's easier to have someone executed, it can often lead to a desensitation of a society's emotions regarding the act of ending the life of a human being. The "turn up the juice" signs outside a prison before an execution are just disturbing and makes me wonder what lessons, if any, people have learned from the believed necessity of ending another's life for crimes against society. view post


Ages posted 01 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionAges by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

True, that you are, Linda. But it's not like a generational difference between us, remember? So I'm still older than most, right? Come on more "old" people! <!-- s:P --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_razz.gif" alt=":P" title="Razz" /><!-- s:P --> view post


The value of a life posted 01 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionThe value of a life by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Quote: &quot;Wil&quot;:3najt8bp
Quite honestly I am in favor of the death penalty, but let me say this first: I do not think that "special laws" should apply because it was a police officer that was killed. Don't get me wrong, I have a great respect for law enforcement, but I don't feel that we can change the rules for them.[/quote:3najt8bp]

But here lies a major problem - the enforcement of the laws vary according to person and situation. In such a case, death penalty opponents would argue, there is room for subjectiveness to creep into the system that decides which punishment to mete out. I'll address this in more detail below.

I agree with the fact that our judicial system needs a major overhaul. There are many major failings, one of which is the overcrowding of our jails and prisons. Not to mention the conditions that the prisoners live in. Many live in better conditions then they did when they were free. I feel that the death penalty is necessary in this case because there simply isn't enough room or money to house all these criminals. There needs to be some way to reduce the numbers of said criminals and rehabilitation works only in some cases.


Let's look at these sentences (nothing personal, just pointing out what you state here is what many others have stated before):

You mention the overcrowding of our jails and prisons. Yes, Americans jail more people as a percentage of the population than any other "free" and "democratic" nation. Yet over 50% of these people are non-violent offenders. Overcrowding thus has little to nothing to do with those serving time for violent crimes, if these statistics are to believe. Likely, there are other explanations for this overcrowding (such as mandatory sentencing) and other possible solutions (a move toward a greater focus on rehabilitation and treatment rather than incarceration).

As for the quality of life "going up" for some, what does this have to do with the death penalty? Yes, the majority of those who commit crimes come from the lowest and least educated groups of citizens (and non-citizens). Yet conditions are not as cozy as what many have been led to believe. I know of those cases for special equipment, but often that is purchased for control purposes (take away certain things, such as exercise equipment, and the potential for rioting increases exponentially. I work in a youth residential treatment center, which functions similarly to a minimum-security prison in many ways. We've learned from past experiences not to restrict freedoms too much among the residents, because if the means of defusing energy and frustration are removed, it becomes like a powderkeg).

And now the issue goes toward money. If only a relatively small minority (say 25%) of prisoners are there for the killing of another human being, irrespective of motives or methods of killing, then wouldn't the argument that prisoners need to be executed more often due to overcrowding become a thorny issue? Only a small number of those convicted of murder ever receive the death sentence, because often the murders were done in acts of passion. That is why the courts have differing degrees of murder.

But I will agree on the need to reduce those who are in prisons, albeit in certain situations (non-violent) and for other options (such as mandatory treatment/rehabilitation).

I do believe that there are crimes that deserve death; the killing of an innocent for one, and mass murder for another. Both these crimes are very detrimental to society, and thus should be punished harshly. I don’t believe that the death penalty should be used for revenge or anything like that, but to remove a threat from society, one that can, if left unchecked, threaten to destroy society as a whole.


But why not life without parole? Isn't that a harsh enough sentence, to sentence one to live, suffer, and die without ever leaving a maximum-security prison? It seems to be an effective punishment in Western Europe and in 12 American states. What purpose could the death penalty serve but to act as a symbol of reprisal/revenge? That's a question I've had for years on this issue. Why execution and not incarceration?

Side note: I would highly recommend Michel Foucault's Disclipine and Punishment as a nice primer book on the move from public punishment to private. He cites Beccaria quite a bit, if I remember correctly.

As to the question “can we put a price on life?” I think that some ways we can, and do. The worth of your life is decided when you look at what said person has given to society as a whole. One who simply leeches of society, I feel, is worth less then someone who contributes a great deal. Since we are such social creatures, and put a great weight on the community, I feel it is valid to judge someone based on what they contribute.


But what are the implications of such a question? Look at how you answered. I'm not attacking you for having such an opinion (in fact, I'd commend you for thinking things through more than many do on this issue, on either side), but there's a sense that those who commit violent acts are often viewed as somehow being "less than human" than those who were victimized (the active victim, and the passive victims, such as the offended society that is sickened by such a criminal act).

It is not an attitude exclusive to this topic. No, it extends out into virtually every branch of human interaction. Has for millenia and probably will continue to do so. Is it right? Is it wrong? Or is it morally neutral to do so? I would think it would depend upon the person judging, the situation being judged, and the foreseen consequences of such a judging.

Nice reply, Wil. Should be interesting to see how this dialogue continues.

Oh, and before I forget, I also recommend highly Norman Mailer's The Executioner's Song, a story about the life and death of Gary Gilmore, the first American executed after the reinstatement of the death penalty in 1976. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 01 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

TakLoufer: Very cool to hear. My mom is an English teacher and I'm considering heading back to school part-time in the near future to work on getting English teaching certification (to go with my endorsements in history, political science, geography, and psychology). I'm beginning to think I'm a glutton for punishment, considering how checkered my teaching career was <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) -->

Best of luck and I must say that I'll continue to read these type of threads, as they make me think in a good way about Life, Universe, and Everything. Sorry, just had to make that Adams reference! <!-- s:P --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_razz.gif" alt=":P" title="Razz" /><!-- s:P --> view post


The value of a life posted 02 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionThe value of a life by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Only in industrialized nations? Actually, one could make the argument that life is more personalized in the rituals and customs of pre-industrial societies than is the case today in a more alienated, "mass" society that offers up the image of the Individual to replace the village or Tradition.

I'll have to search through some of my old research materials for a couple of papers I wrote in college and grad school on symbolism and death, but I do recall that there was a lot of symbolism attached to a birth as well as to a death. So I would have to disagree most strongly with the assumption that life was viewed as "cheap" in any culture, pre-industrial or not.

And as for the other point, about whether or not opposition to capital punishment should be grounded on moral reasons, one could argue that the main impetus for actually having such a system of punishment would be due to moral outrage and a demand for an eye-for-an-eye type of justice. After all, on a purely pragmatic level, prisons that house prisoners that are never to be granted parole can do just as well in preventing further violent acts as execution would, with less change of an innocent person being killed by the state for a crime he/she did not commit.

I guess I should state here that I reject Objectivism (not Ayn Rand's ill-conceived "school", but a historical approach toward evidence and causation) in favor of a more Subjective approach that accounts for human emotions in the equation of human interactions. view post


The value of a life posted 03 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionThe value of a life by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Quote: &quot;Sovin Nai&quot;:11s42ref
Alright, let me clarify. What I mean is this:

1. I don't have any moral objections to killing a human being in retribution for a killing. I don't believe in the forgiveness policy.[/quote:11s42ref]

I'm curious now. Which forgiveness policy are you talking about? A Christian (in all its forms) policy? A Jewish one? Muslim? Other Theistic beliefs? Utilitarian ideas on forgiveness? Which?

Or do you mean forgiving just because some other Agency (whether it be a God, State, or Tradition) says you have to because it heals others?

Just seeking clarification. Hrmm...this belief in a forgiveness policy could make for an interesting discussion of its own.

2. That leaves the value of life to be considered, which is nil in the context in the world. People die every day. There is nothing that special about any human life.


I'd disagree with that last comment. Whether or not something (a life, an action, a process, etc.) is "special" or not depends on associational values that we, as members of societies, place upon ourselves, others, and on objects. I would argue that any life that has its corpse disposed of in any form of ceremony would be considered "special," although probably for vastly differing reasons if compared across space and time with previous and present cultures.

In regards to the life is cheap comment, I did not mean that it is percieved as cheap by less industrialized nations (though it would seem to me, purely on specualtion, that it would be), so much as the fact that it just is. A lot of people die by means that would be preventable with development or better control and order.


A lot of people, in "rich" and "poor" nations alike, die each and every day, whether from preventable causes or not. What I sense lying behind your words is a belief in something analogous to what historians have called the Whig Model of History - that belief that nations/cultures/societies/people are on a scale of sorts from "primitive" to "advanced," with suffering and "lesser" forms of social organization at one end and bounty and "democratic" social forms at the other end.

This model has been discredited in recent decades, especially among cultural historians and others who've noted that the amount of material possessions has little to nothing to do with human quality of life. In fact, there's some evidence emerging that indicates that human health has deteriorated among "advanced" nations in comparison to "primitive" ones. One example cited is the vast increase in mental disorders and illnesses in urban areas, an increase that is well above any accounting for underreporting in less industrialized/urban areas.

So yeah, there might be more cases of physical disease like typhoid fever and malaria that kill others, but this seems to be offset by the sheer mental misery that afflicts a much greater percentage of urban dwellers.

So I guess in the end, it's all a wash.

Sorry if anyone finds this offensive. I respect life and others, but when someone takes a life I believe they forfeit theirs.


No offense taken here, far from it in fact. Years of grad school tend to instill a very tough skin, especially among social science fields <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) --> It's been nice debating and counterpointing here. Not enough people these days bother to take the time to explore their own beliefs, not to mention those of others. I guess that's what I am finding refreshing about this topic and forum in particular - actual honest discussion and exploration of themes. view post


The Case of the Blind Brain and Other Strange Tales posted 03 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionThe Case of the Blind Brain and Other Strange Tales by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Okay, reading this and almost being able to follow some of the subcurrents that are implied has made me acutely aware that I need to read up more on this. So if you guys would please help me here, what are some of the texts that would explain "mental monism," among other things?

I have a feeling that I should know this under another guise, but it's eluding me now...

So any help/suggestions would be greatly appreciated - thanks! view post


Now Reading... posted 04 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Almost halfway through Ricardo Pinto's The Chosen. This is certainly a different breed of fantasy. It's deliberate without dragging, with a very richly layered tapestry of cultural traditions that seem to go beyond surface similarities to certain cultures (although the ones that did come to mind when reading this were pre-Columbian Maya and Toltec, as well as shades of Han China). Seems like the main character, Carnelian, might be of a different persuasion than what you find in most other fantasies, yet it's all done with great care.

Nice counter to Matt Stover's two Caine stories, which I enjoyed as well, even if it sometimes reads as a Steven Segal movie improved twofold with more intelligent dialogue. <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) --> view post


The Case of the Blind Brain and Other Strange Tales posted 04 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionThe Case of the Blind Brain and Other Strange Tales by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Ah, just the typical confusion when jargon synonyms are used. I'm a bit familiar with Subjective Idealism, but that's more in relation to epistomological approaches toward constructing metanarratives to describe possible outlooks on the historical world.

Thanks for the book recs - I'll see if I can spare some money when I go up to Nashville again on my Monday off from work. view post


Now Reading... posted 05 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Excellent choices whichever way you go. I really enjoyed reading both of them a couple of years ago and need to re-read them sometime soon. view post


The value of a life posted 05 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionThe value of a life by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Quote: &quot;Sovin Nai&quot;:6wqshwyq
Thanks.

Re forgivness: I mean that I feel forgiveness is up to each and every person and there is much to be said for not forgiving. I have seen too many people forgive and forgive and get hurt by the same person again and again. If someone chooses not to forgive, I think it can be just as justified, perhaps more so, and healthy as forgiveness.[/quote:6wqshwyq]

Thanks for clarifying this for me. I agree for the most part with what you've said here. Forgiveness means little in the long run if the offending party isn't sorry and makes no attempt to be penitent and to redress the harm he or she has caused. Yeah, forgiveness should not be doled out like free ice cream days, so I think we're in agreement here.

Re life is cheap: Given the number of people who die every year from every different sort of cause, there is not enough weight behind one person's life to offset the punishment of death. In response to Wil, I see what you are saying, and I suppose I agree. However, most convicts have contributed little to society, and so that does not factor into my death penalty stance, I guess.


I don't believe I can agree with this, however, although I understand where you're coming from here. I guess it's just because I don't have this idea of a model that can judge just how much or how little a person is worth (which is the reason why I posted this in the first place, to discuss if there really can be such a model established). Then again, I'm one of those who tend to divorce a person's perceived "worth" from the application of such a punishment as the death penalty. I just wonder why it's even necessary in a world that's shown that plenty of wealthy nations can have abolished capital punishment without suffering dire consequences. Maybe I'm just more worried about the impact such a state sanction regarding killing a person can have on a nation. view post


The Case of the Blind Brain and Other Strange Tales posted 05 July 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionThe Case of the Blind Brain and Other Strange Tales by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I swear, if Causation is ever argued here to any large extent, I'll boycott this part of the site. I still have too many nightmares of Foundations of Graduate Study in History to ever, ever want to even think about the Causation arguments again.

But if this section will avoid that for my sake, I'll be more than happy to read up on some of the things being discussed and more importantly, I'll think about what's being said here. Deal? <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) --> view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Just returned from my monthly excursion to the bookstore. Here's what's on tap:

Sean Stewart, Perfect Circle

Jeff Vandermeer, Secret Life

K.J. Bishop, The Etched City

Charlie Stross, Singularity Sky

Various, Cosmos Latinos: An Anthology of Science Fiction from Latin America and Spain

Richard Morgan, Broken Angels

Stanislaw Lem, The Cyberiad

Hopefully I'll have a bunch of great books to recommend to others in the near future! view post


Now listening to... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow listening to... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Just thought it'd be interesting to see what music the people here are listening to at any given time they feel like replying.

I'll start things out by saying that I am enjoying the recently-released Velvet Revolver CD, which stars the singer of Stone Temple Pilots (Scott Weiland) with ex- everybody but Axl Rose members of Guns'n'Roses. Nice blend. Makes me feel nostalgic for Appetite for Destruction.

So what are you listening to now? view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Cool. I've been meaning to buy it for almost a year now, but something would always come up. So when I saw it in the bookstore tonight, I just had to have it.

Of course, my toughest decision will be which book to read first, seeing as just about all of them are receiving critical acclaims in Locus and elsewhere. Seems like now is just such an exciting time to be a fantasy reader. view post


Now listening to... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow listening to... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Yep, Nirvana is definitely good to listen to. Before this, I've been listening to bootleg live performances by Jimmy Page (with Paul Rodgers, 1988) and Page/Plant (Nashville, 1998 - a concert I went to, no less!) and have been in hard rock heaven. I love bootlegs. view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Yep, VanderMeer's an interesting character. Can't wait to see how much he entertains me with Secret Life. view post


Now listening to... posted 07 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow listening to... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Outkast coupled with Mozart? Very eclectic!

As for country...you should try living in the Greater Nashville Metropolitan Area. If you think country's bad enough from a distance, being around its epicenter is a lot worse.

That being said, there's actually a few "Country" artists that transcend the crappy field and are worth listening to: Johnny Cash, err...Johnny Cash...and uh, Johnny Cash! <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) --> view post


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