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Tattooed Hand Auditor | joined 12 May 2004 | 110 posts


Sex posted 04 August 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionSex by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

Well, sex wise I am a female. Gender wise, I am a bit of a tomboy. Chick stuff isn't terribly interesting to me. Maybe because I study gender and see through some of the programming. But my mother told me I would strip naked everytime she tried to dress me in pink from when I was a wee thing, so maybe it's just a personality trait... view post


More about Erikson books... posted 04 August 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionMore about Erikson books... by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I wasn't sure if that was a typo or a realignment of the timeline... view post


What we look like posted 04 August 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionWhat we look like by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

This is taken a few weeks ago in Paris...I'm in the middle... the last picture of me smoking...(no anti-smoking comments please, I still not over quitting just yet) view post


The Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons posted 04 August 2005 in Author Q & AThe Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

That could be really interesting although there are some minefields, which I am sure you are aware of... for instance, portrayals of matrilineal societies (which doesn't necessary mean an egalitarian society) as primitive, or over the top evil because women are the measuring rods. Or more egalitarian societies (such as central asian tribal cultures) as uncivilized, barbaric, etc...

What would be the implication of making the Sranc, a beastial and brutual race, an unnatural, engineered race by evil (as far as we know now) into the only matriarchial/matrilineal/what ever you are planning to do with them that contrasts with partiarchy?

I can see you putting some kind of twist into this, although I can't anticipate it... ooo, juicy... view post


What we look like posted 04 August 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionWhat we look like by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

Hey that's no excuse, I study history too and I could attach the picture! When you are on the "post reply" screen, scroll down to the "add an attachment" button and hit it, then you "browse" and select the picture file and press "add attachment." view post


What we look like posted 04 August 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionWhat we look like by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

It could be that your image is too large. If it is it flips you back to the top and tells you so in small print... view post


kellhus == good guy?? posted 08 August 2005 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I vote for running, since there is no possible way to win... view post


kellhus == good guy?? posted 09 August 2005 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

The assasination attempt appears more futile once you've read The Warrior Prophet. Don't want to spoil that here, but let's just say that if there is someone good enough to take Kelhus out, I don't want to meet them either! view post


The Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons posted 10 August 2005 in Author Q & AThe Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

You are totally right about specific context determining the form and function of gender relations. You can really see the economically driven forms of modernized patriarchy (because really, in our time and place, that's what it is - you'd be hard pressed to find actual equality or gender blindness) when you look at modernization theory that drove development programs concocted in the US and undertaken in most third world countries.

That is how in Iran you could have an essentially misogynist Shah who was a staunch supporter of women's education and their participation in the workplace. What I looked at in my MA thesis was the cost of this appropriation. Feminist goals became associated with authoritarian methods of control and implementation and "those irrational people" shied away as a revolutionary and democratic act. That's another kind of irony for you...

Esmi as enslaved by liberation and the Sranc as the most equal. It's just interesting since level of Civilization so often uses "how they treat their women" as a litmus test. It would leave the ugly nagging feeling that these beasts are actually more "civilized" (a la moral imperative) than the so called civilized human cultures. That would resonate for the reader only - in the context of the book gender equality would probably be more proof of Sranc as animals.

Is that how you bring out the irony? Playing on the dual level of the context of the book and the general context of the reader? view post


eXXXtremely Important questions which require answers. posted 10 August 2005 in Author Q & AeXXXtremely Important questions which require answers. by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

cligina

pronounced clij-eye-na

I thought that one up over a few beers the other night... view post


The Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons posted 11 August 2005 in Author Q & AThe Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

Cynical Cat, so how do you explain the rise of indentured labor and labor relocation practiced by the British, particularly in South Asia, that resulted in almost identical conditions as slavery? Also, at about the same time as slavery was abolished, hard core racial biogotry solidified which posited whites against colored people as radical others. Before ideas of differences had been much more fluid and based on a vareity of factors. After the abolishion of slavery race became a much more exlusive and rigidified notion to contain socio-economic regimes that slavery had before held into place.

Economics forms shifted with the spread of industrialization and European colonial domination and ideology morphed to readjust. If you want a look at the changing "moral" (I call them ideological) beliefs of the 19th century British empire in the context of anti-slavery activism and race (and gender), you could look at Catherine Hall's Civilising subjects : colony and metropole in the English imagination, 1830-1867. I learned alot from it. view post


The Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons posted 11 August 2005 in Author Q & AThe Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

Sorry about citations, I am writing a paper and in that mode... view post


The Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons posted 12 August 2005 in Author Q & AThe Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I am not saying that economics is the only factor, I think it's a more interactive process.

But slavery was not abolished by moral outrage. That was certainly the clarion call for activists to rally around. But changing socio-economic structures are what made the moral outrage possible in the first place. My point in bring up the changing attitudes of racism were meant to show that the abolition of slavery was not based on moral outrage that blacks are human beings and should not be treated as such - if that is the case, then why were racist attitudes that declared other races subhuman so widely embraced? Hall's book deals with that process in Batpist missionaries in Birmingham and Jamaica in the first half of the 19th century. view post


The Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons posted 13 August 2005 in Author Q & AThe Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I am strictly talking about Britian, not the US.

I am talking about Baptist ministers in the UK that spearheaded the anti-slavery movement. Many of them also moved to places like Jamaica that had plantation systems and began churches to "improve" black slaves. The slave revolts in Jamica and the great revolt in India (where most of the UK's cotton came from by mid century) discouraged many who began to think that "Improvement" for the brown/black person was impossible. And so they began to be seen as permanently (instead of temporarily) subhuman. Improvement was all about making them Westernized in habit and lifestyle and Christian. The ethnocentrism of this form of civilization or religion was totally unacknowledged and any sort of indegenous practices were viewed as heathen/barbaric.

The UK didn't need slaves, they had colonies. Their richest was India and they had the entire country's revunue at their disposal and could control and shape the economy as they pleased. A whole series of justifications, each appropriate to it's own time, was given for this economic and political domination. It was much more acceptable than slavery, but every bit as profitable. Indians laborers made paltry wages for their work, but this was reinvested in the colonial economy and used to maintain themselves as laborers (and make new laborers). view post


TTT cover posted 15 August 2005 in Author Q & ATTT cover by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

Looks like someone splattered blood all over it. Is that what's going to be left of me when I am done with the book! view post


Now listening to... posted 15 August 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow listening to... by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I've listen to Cheb-i Sabbah's La Kahena all weekend. He mixes electronic music very artfully with (on this album) north and west african music and there's this funny song in North african colloquial whose refrain sounds like, "I know some shit." view post


Now Reading... posted 16 August 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I just finished up The Persian Boy by Mary Renault. I don't know if anyone would like this as much as I did. It's about the last 7 years of Alexander the Great's life as told by the Persian eunuch who was his "beloved" (actually referred to this way in the Greek sources. It's a perfect rendition of a "Persian" love story with the lover as the slave of the beloved who lives out most of his life in abject separation from the beloved. It's historical fiction, but the love story really moved me, which is sort of shocking given how jaded and sardonic I am about those sorts of things.

Am also in the middle of reading Midnight Tides for the second time - man those books make so much sense the second time around. I must have been seized with narrative lust the first time around that I missed alot.

Also nosing lazily through White Mughals by William Dalrymple. It's sort of history lite about British in India. English Company man elopes with upper class "native" lady, converts to (gasp) Islam to do so (the author assumes we will all be shocked about this). The funny thing is that the woman is from an Iranian family and he never does deal with this. The background history is atrocious, partly because he is depending on secondary sources with little idea as to their quality and he clearly speaks no Persian or South Asian language. Still, my dissertation is on Iranians in India and Burma and this particular Iranian family was kind enough to leave lots of written records behind!

And lots of boring British colonial documents about anti-Indian riots in Burma in the 1930s. For a paper. view post


The Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons posted 16 August 2005 in Author Q & AThe Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

As a specialist on British colonialism (particularly in India), you're going to have a hard time selling benificent colonialism to me. I could bore you to death about how even seemingly "beneficial" aspects of colonialism were extremely detrimental, primarily because they were first and foremost self-serving. The british took over India at a time of political weakness and Thugees were dealt with just fine by local governments when things were running smoothly.

Merchants made more money using a colonial workforce that was already in place and undercutting their competitors' comparative advantage through the demonization of slave labor.

I am willing to grant you that many activists thought slavery was morally wrong and this is why they narrated (to others and themselves) that they were against it. But if we look at what morally wrong actually means in this context, given that non-white people were at the same time systematically colonized and de-humanized, this morality seems a little different from what you or I might expect from the term. view post


Most cruel act yet? posted 30 August 2005 in The Thousandfold ThoughtMost cruel act yet? by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I think what Moenghus made Cnaiur do really takes the cake for me. Being tricked into betraying your own father unto death and then only after realizing you got played. Oh, and that the guy who tricked you knocked up your mom too and thus got her ripped to bits. And he's 14 when this happens? I totally sympathize with his homocidal tendencies. I don't know if I would actually try to kill Moenghus myself, but I would sure want to... view post


Character heights in Earwa posted 01 September 2005 in Author Q & ACharacter heights in Earwa by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

The tallest man I dated was 6'2" tall. Since I am 5' it made things like the spontaneous kiss impossible, unless I was satisfied with smooching the breastbone.

Perception and actual height are two different things though. One can seem taller due to charisma or intimidating demeanor... or just a big mouth, which I suspect is the case with me... view post


Cnaiur's prowess posted 01 September 2005 in Author Q & ACnaiur's prowess by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I remember Scott saying something, at some point, about some of the non-men going nuts from prolonged life spans or something. Going bonkers could lead to bad decisions, on purpose or not, or simply giving up. This could have leveled their numbers. Also, war among themselves?

The non-man Kelhus meets up north was good at fighting, but wouldn't you be if you had thousands of years to practice? view post


Cities posted 01 September 2005 in Author Q & ACities by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

With the Fanim loose parallel, surely you mean the Seljuks, yes? Just mentioned it because according to the skill I learned when watching Sesame Street, in the list you gave, Seleucid was the one that didn't belong (time period wise). view post


Starring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! posted 01 September 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionStarring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I could see Liam Neeson as Cnauir, but not as Kelhus. Kelhus would have to be younger and hunky. I'm thinking Matthew McConaughey.


Rachel Weisz as Esmenet.

Jessica Alba as Serwe.

Akka is difficult. It would have to be someone older and tortured looking. And not too good looking. view post


Starring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! posted 01 September 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionStarring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

The bubble headed, vain, shallow performance that Alba has given in her film career so far is perfect for Serwe, don't you agree? Of course she can't act, I am not suggesting that she can in thinking she'd be perfect for the role.

I like Rachel McAdams too and, I think she CAN act. She'd be pretty great as Esmenet. Too smart looking to be Serwe. I really think you need someone who has vacant bimbo written all ove them for that roll.

I wish Daniel Day Lewis could have a part, just because he is the best actor ever. view post


Starring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! posted 04 September 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionStarring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

Miranda Richardson is in her late forties. Esmenet is 29. that's about the age difference between my mother and I. I think harding living would age her a bit, but not that much. There are a couple of stand out features about Esmenet in the book - she's attractive, she's got nice legs, and long dark hair.

I agree that everyone shouldn't be all polished and shiny, but that's what makeup and costumes are for, right?! Scott didn't write all the actors as middle aged, dumpy Americans, right...

Ryan Phillippe should be Conphas. He has that arrogant, aristocratic look. view post


Starring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! posted 04 September 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionStarring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I just meant that most of the characters in Bakker's book are not people that are ordinary looking. (Maybe except for Akka) Most of the main characters are described as rather extraordinary. view post


Cnaiur and Serwe posted 05 September 2005 in The Warrior ProphetCnaiur and Serwe by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

The book gives a two part answer. First, Serwe is Cnaiur's "proof" of belonging to the People, something his encounter with Moenghus casts some shadows on both for himself and other People... Kelhus identifies this as the basis of his attachment to Serwe and manipulates it as the only way he can find to manipulate Cnaiur, since all his direct attempts hadn't worked.

So basically Cnaiur is nuts - by the end of the TWP, he confuses Serwe with his favorite wife at home Anissi (sp?) - and Kelhus is very good at tracking that insanity and harnessing it for his own ends. He sort of does the same thing with Serwe, who is off her rocker too. view post


There's a listing for the release posted 14 October 2005 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThere's a listing for the release by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

Now it is listed as February 2005. That's bad. I need it for the second and third week of January. That's my window between orals and teaching. When is the amazon listing going to stabilize, damn it. view post


Cities posted 14 October 2005 in Author Q & ACities by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

Well, the Seljuks did settle down in Baghdad and become "civilized" city folk pretty quickly. They ate up the Ghaznavids as an appetizer and then ruled the Abbasid puppet Caliphs from Baghdad. So maybe Fanim culture is late Abbasids, which would be the thoroughly Arabo-Islamicized Seljuks, whose nobles would be a whole slew of various folks... view post


Cities posted 14 October 2005 in Author Q & ACities by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I picked up one of Goodkind's books once and saw a defensive, jingoistic dedication to the "valiant" people of the CIA who keep the darkness at bay or some such hog wash and I promptly put the book back on the shelf and never picked one up again. How can you read the book of someone who is clearly an ignorant fool?!

I don't really know that much about the medieval world, I just know a little because the classics of Persian literature were written in that period. I'm more of a late 18th, early 19th century kind of person. But Persian lit is a cumulative tradition and you have no context for the later stuff unless you read from the 9th century onwards... view post


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