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Cynical Cat Auditor | joined 05 July 2005 | 98 posts


The Amoral Khellus posted 11 May 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThe Amoral Khellus by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Utilitarian ethics are highly useful, your disdain for them is not withstanding. Using them exclusively does lead to some distasteful decisions, which is one of the reasons to employ multiple ethical systems. Regardless of this, it is a natural system for someone trained by the Dunyain, who do charming things to their failures involving hooks and wires, to adopt.

I wasn't speaking of emotional attachment to Esmanet in the throne room. Akka just tried to steal the Warrior-Prophet's (and Aspect-Emperor's) wife in full view of some of the most powerful people in the nation. Kellhus can't be seen to tolerate that. Killing Akka on the spot would have been the best answer. It ends a threat, saves face, and prevents the truth about Kellhus's abilities from spreading. Instead Kellhus lets him live with only a warning to save face. This is the bare minimum a man in his position can do and far from the optimal decision. He should Akka. All the practical consideration demand Akka's death. He doesn't and instead lets him off with a warning.. view post


Quick and Dirty Prince of Nothing RPG posted 28 August 2006 in RPG DiscussionQuick and Dirty Prince of Nothing RPG by Cynical Cat, Auditor

It's a pen and paper RPG. You should be able to order from them directly or get it at your local gaming store. view post


Quick and Dirty Prince of Nothing RPG posted 31 August 2006 in RPG DiscussionQuick and Dirty Prince of Nothing RPG by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Well, the problems with the Malazan system is that there are no provisions in the Black Company game for handling Warrens. Everything else could be adapted fairly easily (and no surprise in that considering the influence that the Black Company has on the Malazan universe) but a signifigant magic system redesign would be needed.

In further musings, Dunyain could an human raise variant, with its own background (Black Company handles humans slightly differently than vanilla D&D, each character gets a bonus feat, a minor special ability, and bonus class skills based on his background instead of the usual bonus feat and bonus skillpoints). Bluff and Sense Motive could easily be Dunyain background skills. Possibly giving it some special bonuses (Int and Dex boosts) at the cost of a level adjustment might be in order. view post


Heresiarch of the Cishaurim posted 31 August 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtHeresiarch of the Cishaurim by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: "Harrol":2dqmxujf
I will argue that the fanim are more like Christianity than the Inrithi based on the fact that I myself and many other do not worship saints or angels and the point that There is no Biblical Trinity or worship of the other previous mentioned.[/quote:2dqmxujf]

It is important to note that the parellel is between medieval Christian practice and Inthrism, not modern Christian practices, which aside from the variations, are quite different. Medieval Christianity was theoretically monotheistic, but polytheistic in practice. Towns and villages had their own patron saint or angel that was prayed to as an intercessor between the worshipper and God. That is why pilgrimages (visitng the remains of famous saints), relics, and so forth were so important in the medieval period and why certain holidays associated with saints still survive in the modern era. view post


Quick and Dirty Prince of Nothing RPG posted 31 August 2006 in RPG DiscussionQuick and Dirty Prince of Nothing RPG by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: "Entropic_existence":6kh8ht5w
That may work, after all the Dunyain are "bred" and as such would function in much the same way as a sub-race would. Of course canon Dunyain would likely all be Monks of some kind.[/quote:6kh8ht5w]

Weaponmaster class in Black Company, as I said. It doesn't have the blatant over the top supernatural junk of D&D monk and is good with weapons and unarmed. Just a little tinkering with the class to make it more Dunyain like and it should be fine. view post


Was Cnauir gay? posted 05 September 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtWas Cnauir gay? by Cynical Cat, Auditor

It's pretty clear in The Darkness That Comes Before, the Cnauir had a homosexual relationship with Moenghus. Scott doesn't directly state it, but the contextual evidence is strong including the "Is it a sin for me to touch you thus?" line on page 369 (I'm rereading the book and just past that part). view post


Fight Scenes? posted 05 September 2006 in Writing TipsFight Scenes? by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Not to be mean, but in my opinion Salvatore is a horrible writer of fight scenes. He writes fights like a D&D combat. You don't get a sense of real injuries. No punctured lungs, slashed tendons, or disembowelments or the like. It's just antiseptic hit point loss ending in death with hits but no injuries described. view post


Fantasy posted 05 September 2006 in Literature DiscussionFantasy by Cynical Cat, Auditor

I support the death penalty for spammers.

And with magic, although I tend towards preferring more than less, consistency is the key. Scott handles it beautifully, even if I wanted more information faster (although it did get me salivating for the next book). I think one of the best touches is that magic is far from completely understood by its practitioners, although some of its rules are codified and a considerable body of skill and knowledge has developed regarding its practice (Jack Vance does something similar with the more whimsical Dying Earth stories). It allows for the events of the climax of The Thousandfold Thought to occur and be a surprise, but not an unfair one, to the reader. view post


Anasurimbor Maithanet? posted 09 September 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtAnasurimbor Maithanet? by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Moenghus's statements on the children not being Dunyain are not reliable indicators of anything other than Moenghus beliefs and he is shown to not be infallible. In fact, his errors lead to his death. This has been discussed in other threads but to restate a few points

1) The Dunyain cull their own ranks. Thus the Dunyain born don't measure up. A far larger statistical sample than Moenghus would have been able to generate would be required to know whether Moenghus's offspring were merely a statistical aberration

2) Dunyain training is resource intensive in the form of enviromental conditions, the need for skilled trainers, etcetera. There are far more limits on Moenghus's ability to recrateate the conditions at Ishual than there are to Kelhus's.

3) Genetics inheritance, especially for intelligence, isn't a sure thing. The Dunyain breed for reflexes and intelligence and then cull (what percentage, we don't know) but that only means that doesn't insure superiority over world born men, just high performance in those areas.

4) Maithanet maybe inferior to a Dunyain in Moenghus's estimation, but he was still able to quickly seize control of the Thousand Temples, uncover spies and skin spies, and was confident of his ability to personally seize and disable a skin spy sorcerer. Those are impressive accomplishments and not much inferior to what a Dunyain could do. view post


Esmet's betrayl, Bakker's massogeny, and a criticism posted 15 September 2006 in The Warrior ProphetEsmet's betrayl, Bakker's massogeny, and a criticism by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: "Scel":111cuic4
People should remember that Strong and "Liberated" women are a recent development in our world...and indeed are unknown in some contemporary cultures.

Now in (even a fictional world) world that is patriachial, women were marginalised. And OUR modern concepts would seem totally out of place.
[/quote:111cuic4]

Not entirely true, in some cultures women could wield considerable power and attain very high status (Norse, Iroquois, and ancient Egypt, to name three). Even medieval Europe isn't without notable power and influence (Eleanor of Aquitaine to name one).

That said, the Three Seas is more misogynistic than Medieval Europe. Esmenet did the best she could with her very limited options. Her moving into new roles and handling greater responsibilities is a very potent condemnation of the attitudes of the people of the Three Seas. view post


Anasurimbor Maithanet? posted 28 September 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtAnasurimbor Maithanet? by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: "Madness":e3lg1nqz


First, I'd like to write a rebuttal towards Cynical's points on my ideas concerning Moenghus' children.

Moenghus's statements on the children not being Dunyain are not reliable indicators of anything other than Moenghus beliefs and he is shown to not be infallible. In fact, his errors lead to his death.


True, Moenghus' statements on Dunyain + non-Dunyain offspring cannot be taken as 100% truth, as it is speculation on his part and a character of even Moenghus' abilities can be wrong. However, the statements made are not wrong due to his beliefs, as he has not yet come to believe anything, but due to his hindered Dunyain abilities and progress through the Thousandfold Thought. Likewise, his death is not caused by any error of his unless you count him putting out his eyes, but caused by Kellhus' more extensive exploration of the Thousandfold Thought. Moenghus did not yet know the possibilities that branched from his encounter with Kellhus as it had taken him a large part of his thirty years to grasp that the Thought included a summons to Ishual and his true son. I honestly don't think he explored the Thousandfold Thought much after grasping this, thinking that possibilites and the shortest path would become apparent to him upon meeting his son. [/quote:e3lg1nqz]

On the contrary, he immediately rejects Kelhus's claims of communicating with the No-God out of hand, choosing instead to believe that Kelhus is instead defective when available evidence shows that Kelhus is far from that. Moenghus does not investigate this claim or consider it, he immediately rules Kelhus broken because of it. This is not only a mistake, but one based on his belief system. His unwillingness to even consider the point was one of the reasons Kelhus decided to kill him. He was no longer useful and had become a dangerous liability. A fatal error.


As to your other points, Cynical. In all honesty I think the first three have already been negated by other members in this and other threads.


I haven't seen any effective rebutals to my points. If you think they exist, post them.


All Dunyain are not all Anasurimbor.


Statistically speaking, every one of European descent is probably a descdent of Charlamaigne. The Dunyain are a more concentrated population and have gone on for an even longer time. Not that being an Anasurimbor is one of my points, but after 2000 years in one place they are all related.


Anyhow, as the Dunyain did and do cull their ranks every generation, each subsequent generation gets smarter then breeds with eachother, then cull the less intelligent and physically fit again, and repeat. Compound that two thousand years.

They are still human beings, subject to the genetic lottery and limited by human physiology. Selective breeding isn't magic where you can guarrantee will get the traits you desire and two thousand years is a very short period of time, breeding wise. What its going to accomplish among the Dunyain is not being superhuman but the majority of their population tending towards the higher end of the traits they are breeding for (which are intelligence and reflexes).


Therefore, to tie it back to your point or points I guess as it hits a couple of them, when Moenghus and Kellhus couple with worldborn women their children can never compare to true Dunyain. Which is also why Kellhus uses Esmenet, her being a very intelligent women in a male dominate society.


Do you know what scientists call a sample size of 1? Too small. Kelhus and Moenghus can have mentally retarded children, children with dwarfism, short children, tall children, or brilliant children just like the rest of us.


Point 2 and 3 kind of deal with my above paragraph. When commenting or thinking on the Dunyain you have to think in terms of two thousand years, as Cnaiur does. Moenghus probably did try and duplicate Ishual and their teachings when raising Maithanet for his task. However, knowing that a worldborn child couldn't compare with true Dunyain, there was no need for Moenghus to try and train Maithanet as such.

Moenghus lacked the resources of an emperor or Ishual. The amount of experience and resources contained within a single pragma must be immense and Moenghus not only lacked them he was also blind. He provided an inferior training enviroment to Inshual, which flunks some of its students, and managed to train the Maithanet so that he produced many Dunyain skills.


Your third point is as well ignorant of the above concept. Make no mistake, a Dunyain baby is not a worldborn baby. Perhaps in the days following the apocalypse a worldborn baby might have compared to a Dunyain one but, again, not after the compounding factor.

Evidence? Two human babies, one part of a selective breeding program the other not. What if the Dunyain one is born with brain damage? Again I will remind you the Dunyain aren't superhuman. There is no guarrantee the Dunyain child is faster or smarter than the worldborn one, just a likelyhood that the Dunyain child will be faster and smarter than the average human.


Your right, Genetic inheritance especially for intelligence isn't a sure thing. However, as they do kill the offspring that don't measure up, as I said they probably have to do a lot less culling these days.


We have no knowledge of the exact culling numbers or how they change, but we are not without evidence. Inshual is not a large place and the preserved defectives with hooks in their faces are indicative of a fairly large cull. Even with modern medicine they are going to face a host of medical problems and live comparitively short lives (and thus need to be replaced). Given Inshual's limited population and that they aren't the only ones being culled, the culled would have to make a signifigant percentage of the population. One can only cull so much of the population without killing it off. To sum up, there's only so many that can cull without endangering themselves and they still cull signifigantly.


Maithanet is inferior to Dunyain but superior to worldborn man. He's inbetween, in my understanding. He is also one of the Few as are many Dunyain, I assume, but as Proyas says to Achamian in TDTCB (oh, how I wish I had my books with me), many Shriah's have been of the Few. They just choose not to stain themselves with the blood-of-the-onta.


Scott has indicated that the Few are a product of both genetics and the ability to think in certain ways. Dunyain training, despite denying the existence of sorcery, is clearly compatable with the thought processes of being the Few (Kelhus's performance in the TTT makes this a bit of an understatement).


Though, Maithanet, regardless of natural intelligence and ability would not have been to do these things.


Without being trained, no Dunyain can do anything extraordinary. Its the training that makes them exceptional. It clearly requires high levels of intelligence and quick reflexes to successfuly grasp. This is in fact, my point. It's the training that makes the Dunyain superior. Both Cnaiur and Kelhus are extraordinary individuals physically and mentally, but only one is Dunyain and that training makes the difference.


Think. Moenghus has Maithanet play to Inrithi faith by walking unharmed from heathen lands. He's able to uncover every factions spies through Cishaurim intelligence and counter-intelligence who would be able to identify Xerius' spies in the Thousand Temples, and pull out their own when their task was done, giving the illusion of cleansed. Maithanet himself could be the Cishaurim's spy if need be.


I don't know what your point here is. I've been saying all along that Maithanet is extraordinary.


What if the prior Shriah was a Consult skin-spy and through Moenghus' interrogations of the captured skin-spies he was able to assern this?


Quite possible. That's one of the things that makes them scary. view post


Anasurimbor Maithanet? posted 28 September 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtAnasurimbor Maithanet? by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: "vercint":3ssm4wlf


First, I think we can say for certain that many of the Dunyain are of the Few. Moenghus contacted them through dreams, using the Cishaurim version of the spell Akka names 'Calling'. In TWP Akka explains how this cant works: the person doing the calling must know the person he's calling to, and he must know where the person is. Logically, both people must also be of the Few.[/quote:3ssm4wlf]

This doesn't follow. You have shown no reason why the reciever has to be one of the Few. I don't necessarily disagree, but the only thing that has been established is that the sender must be a sorcerer, not the reciever must be one of the Few. That in every other instance in the books both are sorcerers tends to support that both must be of the Few, but you didn't mention that.

As for numbers, giiven the Dunyain's limited gene pool and mental training, its likely a lot of them are among the Few. view post


Dunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy posted 28 September 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtDunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy by Cynical Cat, Auditor

There is no doubt that the Dunyain teach a variety of useful mental and physical skills, but it is equally clear that their entire philosophy is intellectually bankrupt and their hierarchy is dishonest.

Despite claiming to be seekers for the truths of things they systematically isolate themselves from all sources of information and banish or destroy any evidence that leads to contrary conclusions. They systematically supress evidence of the Outside (and sorcery, since the two are linked) because it conflicts with their ideology.

They are, in their own way, almost as bound to What Comes Before as the world born. For the Dunyain their is only What Has Been Decided At Ishual and those who threaten that are banished or slain. To be fair, their great intellectual abilities allowed Moenghus and Kelhus to quickly adapt to the true circumstances of the world.

Thoughts? view post


Anasurimbor Maithanet? posted 29 September 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtAnasurimbor Maithanet? by Cynical Cat, Auditor

I agree that the inference to make is that one needs to be a member of the Few, but that is never directly stated or confirmed. Since the only examples we have of the communication are the passing of sensitive intelligence between Schoolmen and Moenghus's contacts, we simply don't know. I don't have a problem with that, I'm just pointing out the evidence to support exclusivity is circumstantial at best.

As for the Dunyain contacted by Moenghus, yes they committed suicide. However, the Calling would have stopped when they sent Kelhus. It was extremely strenous on Moenghus and he could only reach people he knew, which limits the number of people who could have attempted. He only needed to reach enough people that sending Kelhus out would have been the easiest course for the Dunyain to make, which implies that he could have contaced even more people if he refused them. Whether that was actually true or not (he only needed to make the Dunyain believe that) we don't know. Since he was banished about thirty five years back, thats more than another generation of Dunyain to augment however many of the Few were not contaminated by Moenghus. view post


Dunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy posted 29 September 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtDunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: "vercint":b9fdm3ut

CC, the Dunyain are not 'seekers of truth' (that would be a certain Richard Rahl); they seek to become a 'self-moving soul'. To achieve this they isolate themselves so that the 'outside' can't influence them. They believe the truth is found within, not in the world around them.
They know the world is out there (although they have no idea what it looks like) but they just don't want to be part of it. To be part of the world is to be moved by it; only in isolation can one hope to become self-moving.[/quote:b9fdm3ut]

That's only partially true. The Dunyain deny the existence of the Outside because of the implications it has on the power of "what comes before" and the influence it can on the world and the soul. They have chosen to deny the existence of Outside not because it isn't important (the Outside connects to the world through souls after all) but because it doesn't fit their nice theory. Their withdrawl from the world is equally dishonest, for they have substituted the preconceptions of Inshual for those of the world, not eliminated preconceptions all together. The best illustration of this is that both Moenghus and Kelhus have better understandings of the nature of the soul once they enter the world.

And lastly, since the name Dunyain means "truth", for them to deliberately lie about the nature of the world is dishonest. view post


Dunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy posted 29 September 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtDunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: "Harrol":3fqkqy1r
That leads to the next question. To the Dunyain what is truth. Is the truth freeing your soul? If that is the case then all other lies are justified by the ends. I do not state that to imply that the Dunyain need to justify anything. To them they need only take the shortest path.[/quote:3fqkqy1r]

Of course they need to justify their actions. That they don't is why they are in danger of following the Consult onto the path of mass genocide. Disregard for moral consequences doesn't mean they don't exist. view post


Infinity, destiny and The Prince Of Nothing's philosophy posted 29 September 2006 in Philosophy DiscussionInfinity, destiny and The Prince Of Nothing's philosophy by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: "DrunkenAfficianado":awpi7br6
snip[/quote:awpi7br6]

Get a grip. This we were the first three books of what now is a seven book series. This is merely setting the stage for the Second Apocalypse. You don't get closure and resolution before the series is half way through.

As for comparison with Convent, Convent was a rapist shmuck who wanted to be powerless because then he wouldn't be responsible. Kelhus embraces responsibility and does what is necessary to unite the Three Seas in a fashion that has a chance of surviving the Second Apocalypse. Instead of running away from responsibility when confronted by it, he embraces it.

As for the question of free will, everyone is shaped by the society and enviroment around them. The Dunyain's obsession with free will makes them interesting, but it doesn't make the book depressing. As for depressing, they haven't lost yet. The battle is only about to begin. view post


Inchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... posted 02 October 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtInchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... by Cynical Cat, Auditor

He's one of the Old Names, the original members of the Consult who have survivied until present day. And probably completely insane in a very scary way. view post


Dunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy posted 03 October 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtDunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Considering that they Dunyain destroy all sorcerous marks and paraphenalia when they arrive at Ishual 2000 years ago, we can assume their anti-sorcery beliefs are old and arrise during a time when the existence of sorcery was obvious.

As for resolution on the subject of morality and the Outside, I doubt we will get it. If we do I doubt it will happen before the last book, which is some time away. Dunyain beliefs on the nature of reality no more credible than that of Young Earth Creationists for the same reason: both ignore evidence in preference to holding on to what they would prefer to be true. The Dunyain world view ignores the Outside which is not the same as the various worldly attitudes which only partially understand the Outside. Whether or not there are consequences for various actions in the afterlife is something that we don't know for sure. It is interesting that the Inchoroi do believe such consequences exist and that the Nonmen who appear to have different values than human are probably the source of those Inchoroi beliefs. I look foreward to future books and future illumination on this subject. view post


Dunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy posted 03 October 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtDunyain Intellectual Bankruptcy by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: "Harrol":3l1tredd
I missed the part where Earwa had young earth creationist. <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) -->[/quote:3l1tredd]

I'm sure its somewhere in the Books of the Tusk. <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> view post


Other forums frequented posted 07 October 2006 in Off-Topic DiscussionOther forums frequented by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Star Destroyer.net, a sci-fi and current events centered debate forum that can be pretty rough.

Librium Arcana, a sci-fi, fantasy, and rpg centered forum. view post


Inchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... posted 09 October 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtInchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... by Cynical Cat, Auditor

To add to White Lord's comments, the Fanim believe that the Cisharum aren't damned, but holy. Sorcery is condemned by the Tusk, but it is a collection of religious documents written by men, although possibly be men with some understanding of Agencies of the Outside (or maybe not) and added two and commented on, not the least by Inrithas and Kelhus. Even previous to Kelhus, the condemnation of sorcery by the Tusk has been challenged by scholars in the Three Seas (In Defence of Sorcery is mentioned several times.) Our view is somewhat coloured by having most of the books's viewpoint characters raised in a culture that believes all sorcery is abominable and taking place mostly among the Inrithi. Even Akka is tormented by his damnation. Only Kelhus is detatched from considerations (with the possible exception of Conphas <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> ). view post


Inchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... posted 11 October 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtInchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Incu-Pacifico&quot;:3r5ji5kh

Well the metaphysics of the Cishaurim is different from the other schools of sorcery...and I believe there was a mention of some questioning whether Cishaurim was actually sorcery at all. So perhaps the nature of the Pshuke protects its practitioners from getting that unwanted attention?
[/quote:3r5ji5kh]

Kelhus gives us our best explanation on why the Pshuke is different than other forms of sorcery. It is still sorcery, merely undistinguishable from the natural world. Most tellingly, it is still affected by chorae. The attitudes of the Cishaurim might score them some points with the Outside or they might not. We don't know.

As for the Mandate, they are the defenders of the world against extermination. They have not only power, but a higher purpose and their saying reflects that. Which, of course, leads to Akka's friend's speculation that they who sacrifice their very souls for the opportunity to defend the world and expect only damnation are the holiest of men. view post


Inchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... posted 12 October 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtInchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Incu-Pacifico&quot;:1sbugoin


I remember mention being made that Pshuke was more emotion-based than the Anagogic socery (logic based). Also, it didn't leave a &quot;mark&quot; and was invisible to the logic-based Anagogic schools. As you said though, chorae still affect them.

Hmmm...I think there's a clue there somewhere...if only we could figure it out. <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) -->

Perhaps it has something to do with logic going against the &quot;natural flow&quot;?

[/quote:1sbugoin]

Well, if Kelhus is correct, its the intuitive, emotional nature of the sorcery that is the reason they don't have a mark. They blind themselves so they have distractions in their attempts to percieve the onta. They have a good &quot;feel&quot; for how the onta should be because of their altered perception and the intuitive nature of their magic, so their workings fit in with the natural world better and thus leave no mark.

Of course, their are advantages to having a systematic, intellectual understanding of your practice which is why Anagogic and Gnostic sorcery is more powerful and versatile.





Yes, this is exactly right. For the Mandate. However, I don't think it's true for the other schools. They're not serving a higher cause, though many still seem to feel condemned to damnation (see, Iyokus's conversation with the demon).


What's revealing about Iyokus's conversation is that he has definitely gotten himself some negative attention from the Outside, but wasn't necessarily damned before that point. As for the Scarlett Spires, I doubt their naked and ruthless power lust scores them points with anything benevolent on the Outside. view post


Inchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... posted 13 October 2006 in The Thousandfold ThoughtInchoroi and Sorcerer Goals. Call for theories... by Cynical Cat, Auditor

The Nonmen refer to gods and demons as Agencies, a practice retained by Gnostic magicians for obvious reasons. As we only have knowledge of one particularily kind of Agency we are, like the inhabitants of the Three Seas, reduced to trying to deduce the will of the gods with insufficient evidence. <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: -->

As for Chorae and demons, the demons didn't merely sense the absence of a chorae, they exploded into burning salt when struck by a chorae arrow (&quot;an absence at the end of a stick&quot;). The Outside doesn't much seem to like chorae either. The Tears of God may really piss off God. <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> view post


Gnosis vs. Anagogis, and sorcery in general posted 16 October 2006 in Author Q &amp; AGnosis vs. Anagogis, and sorcery in general by Cynical Cat, Auditor

It is mentioned that practitioners of the Psuhke don't have the control or sophistication of Anagogic or Gnostic sorcery, which is consistent with it being an intuitive rather than intellectual practice. This implies that certain feats possible with Anagogic or Gnostic sorcery simply aren't possible with the Psuhke. view post


Gnosis vs. Anagogis, and sorcery in general posted 19 October 2006 in Author Q &amp; AGnosis vs. Anagogis, and sorcery in general by Cynical Cat, Auditor

All the Anagogic schools are descended from the Cenian Sakas. The Imperial Saik is proud that it remains loyal to Nansur, the successors of Cenia. view post


Gnosis vs. Anagogis, and sorcery in general posted 01 November 2006 in Author Q &amp; AGnosis vs. Anagogis, and sorcery in general by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Scott has mentioned that Gnostic Sorcery can be used to summon and bind agencies. view post


Are there female skin spies? posted 19 June 2007 in The Thousandfold ThoughtAre there female skin spies? by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Jamara&quot;:qfgxfrfy
seeing as how the kin spies are new constructs and the non-men (as far as we have seen) have all aligned with the Consult,[/quote:qfgxfrfy]

We know that not to be true. The Inchoroi mention that they have spies even in a surviving mansion of the Nonmen. The Erratics are a different story, of course, but we definitely know that some part of Nonman civilization survives and is an enemy of the Consult. view post


Punishing the Shrial Knights posted 19 June 2007 in The Darkness That Comes BeforePunishing the Shrial Knights by Cynical Cat, Auditor

Saubon wants the love and admiration that he was denied by his tyrannical father. He thinks the way to get this is by military successes (remember that he once fought Conphas himself to stand still in battle) and by becoming king by his own hand. What he really wants is love and respect, but he has confused this in his own mind by becoming king (and thus being great and having love and respect).

This is why he is so close to his nephew (the son of his sister who used to protect him from his father), why the words of his groom are so devastating to him and how Kelhus is able to manipulate him so easily. Like most world born men, Saubon doesn't truly know himself. His actions in the Warrior-Prophet and The Thousandfold Thought are easily understood if you keep these traits in mind. view post


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