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H Auditor | joined 05 February 2005 | 87 posts


Prince of Nothing on TV/Big Screen posted 17 July 2005 in Author Q & APrince of Nothing on TV/Big Screen by H, Auditor

A possible 'under-appreciated' alternative could be to do the series as an animated show. This would dramatically reduce the cost to make it, plus it would just look damn cool too. Hell, look at how popular that Star Wars: Clone Wars show is, and it is essentially a kids show with terrible animation...

My problem lately with Japanesse animation is the lack of origional concepts (and not to mention 'adult' themes too). A gritty fantasy work like PoN could be an amazing subject, and if done well, could actually give some reputablity to American animation as an 'adult' medium. view post


Prince of Nothing on TV/Big Screen posted 18 July 2005 in Author Q & APrince of Nothing on TV/Big Screen by H, Auditor

Well, yeah more anime in Japan is adult in the sense that it contains a rediculous ammount of sexual innuendos, or is hentai. I was meaning a more adult story like, as in a more realistic or gritty storyline. Most anime's are about 13 year old gils who get transported back in time, or about a kid's rise to some skill level, or about giant robots. Sure, there are exceptions, but i haven't seen too many with what could be called a 'gritty' stroyline. (One could say Neon Genesis, or Cowboy Bebob could be exceptions.)

Also, i do realize that no Japanese director would wnat to do such a series. Hence way i was saying that it would most probably have to be an American animation studio....

All in all, it would be tough to pull off, but i think it could be done, but like anything else, it would take a fair ammount of talent to write a convincing screen-play and make it look good... view post


Starring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! posted 23 July 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionStarring "Insert Actor Here" as Kelhuss! by H, Auditor

OK, i know it's rather contrary to how he's described in the book, but i always envision Kellhus looking like the guy who played the Mummy in The Mummy (1999) (Arnold Vosloo). Not sure why, i mean, doesn't the book describe him as having a beard? view post


Now Reading... posted 23 July 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by H, Auditor

Finished Shadow & Claw by Gene Wolfe, now reading Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. I'm taking Sword & Citadel, Ironfire, and A Short History of Byzantium on this week long camping trip i'm going on, so we'll see how much reading i'll get done... view post


TTT cover posted 31 July 2005 in Author Q & ATTT cover by H, Auditor

Well, Scott, there is always a site such as <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.megaupload.com/">http://www.megaupload.com/</a><!-- m --> where you can upload the pdf to for people to grab.

Once one of us has it it wouldn't be too hard to make a jpg of it which could be posted here too. view post


Now Reading... posted 31 July 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by H, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Da-krul&quot;:12akpsz4
Nothing


Any suggestions? and NOT dragonlance or other series that has 100 books <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D -->[/quote:12akpsz4]

I enjoyed Blood Merridian. If your looking for some history, Caesar's Legion is a good one i recently read. If you haven't read it yet, The Book of the New Sun is also pretty good.

Currently getting started on Ironfire. view post


Our own unique, original euphemisms for naughty bits... posted 31 July 2005 in Off-Topic DiscussionOur own unique, original euphemisms for naughty bits... by H, Auditor

Someone in my non-immediate family decided to use the word cookie for the lower female anatomy. It's become a pet joke among my immediate family (none of us get the parallel either).

"If she was wearing underwear, she wouldn't be showing her cookie off."

And to shamelessly rob a term from romance novels, we shall dub the male lower anatomy the man root.

"Her loins envied his thick man root." view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 07 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Hmmm, got me think here White Lord, when you comment about the connection between wisdom and trees.

I've read a bunch of stuff by CG Jung and his study of alchemy. In alchemy, the tree or arbor philosophica, is a favorite symbol representing the alchemical process. It can be symbolic of the growth of knowledge into wisdom (or divine understanding). Much of alchemy was devoted to discovering the divine through the experimentation or understanding of base materials (or to be more poinant the terrestrial world itself). The tree symbol can be a powerful symbol of the process itself. The roots being in the terrestrial world, soaking up nutriants (knowledge). The trunk ascends to upward (toward heaven/the unknown/ the divine). The leaves are the fruit of the synthesis, the 'flowering' of wisdom (better yet divine understanding).

That being said, the tree can also be the bridge between the ascendant (the divine) and the terrestrial.

This interpretation leads to an interesting view of Odin's hanging from the tree. Suspended between the terrestrial and the ascendant, it was as if he was to be the fruit of the tree (in other words, divine). Or instead of becoming the tree he made himself a part of it.

Hmmm, thinking now, one could equate 'divine' herein with 'transcendental', if that seems to make more sense. That being said, make this is all just loose associations and wishful thinking on my part... view post


Cnaiur's prowess posted 07 August 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACnaiur's prowess by H, Auditor

Perhaps they don't last long because they are mostly pathologically insane (by our standards)? I doubt if anyone wouldn't notice a guy who insanely beautiful with a cloak of faces on... Not to say they all would be doing this, but wouldn't a nonman stick out like a sort of sore thumb anyway? A line of soldiers, and one (who's incredably beautiful mind you) isn't nervous or scared or even fazed by the violence and trauma, in fact he seems to be craving it. Plus, he's at least ten times any fighter most have ever seen. I think some one like that would, as Scott said, "not tend to last long" before they call out the 'dogs' so to speak to put 'em down... Sure, could a nonman kill 5-10 guys, yes. But could he really kill alot of well trained nobles with chorae? Probably not. The nobles are the one's who'd realize what the nonman was, and thus be the one's who would probably kill 'em, meaning the killers would be well prepared and well trained... view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 07 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Quote: &quot;White Lord&quot;:4fdfq9ex
An interesting clue is that when I let the thing drop in the Q&amp;A board, that Kellhus could be both the son of Moenghus and of God, Scott commented with a short but interesting "Mwahahaha...."[/quote:4fdfq9ex]

Classic Scott, <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: -->

Could Moenghus have "transcended" to Godlyness by means of the Thousandfold Thought perhaps? And now that Kellhus has "embraced" TTT, he has now begun to "transcend" as well? (Halos as a classic symbol of transcendental nature of somehting.) view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 07 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Quote: &quot;White Lord&quot;:qaz51r21
Just another short comment on the vision Kellhus has of the No-God.

Clearly the tree is connected to the No-God, so how are we to take it that a symbol of wisdom is associated to an entity we have till now viewed as evil?

Is there more to the No-God than meets the eye?

That his actions promise no good to humanity is to me certain, still I'm used to Scott always twisting meanings, making it hard to pigeonhole anyone that I'm starting to think that "pigeonholing" the No-God definitely right now could be a little premature . . .[/quote:qaz51r21]

I've been unable to shake the idea that the No-God is not at all 'evil" since i first read the book and heard the name 'No-God'.

Perhaps the No-God represents the fact that so called 'divine power' is not in fact divine, but in fact a development of knowledge into 'true' wisdom. The tree from the No-God makes perfect sense then, as he is the pinnacle of the theory of transcendental power sans the God or gods-hence the name No-God.

Doesn't seem so far off from what Kellhus has as he comes off the tree, he has recieved transcendental wisdom, not from a God, but from within, from the Thousandfold Thought. view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 07 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Quote: &quot;White Lord&quot;:2f32zgmn
That tallies with my thinking as well. Actually in other threads I've said that perhaps man is meant to strive towards godhood, and that sorcery is simply one (or the only) means which can bring it about (as in the study of the esoterics as Scott calls it).

I also think some of the "agencies" or gods were men once.[/quote:2f32zgmn]

Good point. This could be a very good reason why the Schools (especially the Mandate, being the most powerful) are so against the No-God. If sorcery is the most powerful form of transcendental power available, then i can see how the No-God is a real threat to the School's power, in that the No-God may be able to wield power beyond sorcerer's scope without the need for the Few or for sorcery at all. And if the No-God's power was able to be had by other's, this would make the Few very very expendable, and not nearly as powerful as they are now... view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 07 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Quote: &quot;White Lord&quot;:2fyrwxul
Also, as another clue to the nature of Moenghus (or Father really), check the meeting between Kellhus and the Cishaurim in Caraskand. The Cishaurim, as far as I remember doesn't call Moenghus by name. He calls him "your Father . . ."

He also says he is the one the possessors of the third sight serve. The Cishaurim, all of them have the third sight, and they all serve the Solitary God, ergo . . .

I don't know how accurate this is, but it's still interesting . . .[/quote:2fyrwxul]

Hmmm, your right, i remember rereading that scene a few weeks ago.

I think it's a very real possibility that Moenghus has 'transcended' and taken on the role of the so called Solitary God in order to wield the power of the Cishaurim againt someone...just who, i'm not sure, perhaps the Consult... view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 07 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Yeah, that's what i was trying to say (it's very late here, and my description seemed to make sense at the time <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: -->) in that the No-God could make the Few unneccessary, in that without the God or 'sorcery' he has immense power. Which is actually kind of what Kellhus has done so far...without sorcery he has managed to have alot of power by sort of 'mundane' means. This seems to scare both the Consult and the Schools quite a bit...

Indeed, i think that what the No-God found was that he could access power without the neccessity of the 'distraction' of belief in God, or gods. Meaning his power wasn't filtered by his oown expectations. He wasn't an agent of a God anymore, he was wielding the most powerful of powers himself.

If you've ever played the White-Wolf roleplaying game, i sort of equate it with the way 'magic' works in there. In that at the highest level of power, you no longer need spells, foci, or anything else to harness your power, you have simply become able to wield it 'natually' and thus unfettered by any extraneous needs that may be imposed by an extraneous sort of ontology.

That's what i think the No-God did, manage to use the God's power, minus the need for the God, or even belief in the God itself, making all that power the No-God's and the No-God's alone.


That being said, i need some sleep, i think my theories are becoming more and more crackpot as i go. I'll philosophize this a little more tomorrow! <!-- s8) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_cool.gif" alt="8)" title="Cool" /><!-- s8) --> view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 08 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Cynical Cat&quot;:22jbb19m
1) The No-God is intelligent.

2) It's freaking powerful

3) It's not all knowing or even self knowing.

4) It's a construct.

To me, that screams an intelligent war machine. Very scary, but not something I'm inclined to revere.[/quote:22jbb19m]

It's been a while since i read the books, but how do we know that the No-God is not self-knowing? view post


Cnaiur's prowess posted 08 August 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACnaiur's prowess by H, Auditor

We're a bit off topic here, but wasn't the Consult created after the First Apocalypse to try to bring about the No-God's return?

Plus, it seems natural (at least to me) that Norisai would probably have faught in highly organized groups (perhaps a phalanx), so it would be obvious why the Scylvendi would respect them, in the same way the Germanic tribes respected the strength of the Legions.

EDIT: Nevermind that first question, i was making up things in my head... view post


The Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons posted 08 August 2005 in Author Q &amp; AThe Status of Women and Some Real World Comparisons by H, Auditor

Here's two crackpot sort of theories about Scott's cheeky comments on Sranc:

1.) Perhaps they are hermaphraditic (or at least androgenous). This could explain the 'beauty', in from the fact that perhaps their appreance was created by taking the 'perfect' human face and creating a blueprint from it. Eliminating the gender specific clues from a face could make it look oddly beutiful and seem strangly 'perfect' looking. Plus wouldn't that make them ideal constructs, as each would be both able to breed, bare children, and fight eliminating the need for a sort of 'non-combatant' sranc to support themselves. This could also explain why thier numbers overwhelmed the North. In each generation (even if Men could breed at the same rate) only half a population of Men could feasably be soldiers, while 100% of a Sranc population would be soldiers. That's a significant difference, even if the Sranc were half stupid, sheer numbers dictate they should overwhelm almost anyone in a relatively short time (especially, as my friend just pointed out to me, if they mature faster than Men or breed at a faster rate).

2.) Perhaps they are haploidic. OK, this is really crackpot, but, hey, i guess it could be possible. Maybe somewhere there are Queen Srancs, who are truely bad ass mofos. OK, maybe i'm just getting carried away, but it would be cool... view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 08 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Cynical Cat&quot;:2kbf4ltj
Him shouting "What am I?" over and over seems to indicate that it doesn't know its own nature.[/quote:2kbf4ltj]

Oh yeah. OK, i blame the heat here for causing me to lose my memory totally...even if that may not be true. <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: --> view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 09 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Mithfânion&quot;:v1vwg0vv
I've been unable to shake the idea that the No-God is not at all 'evil" since i first read the book and heard the name 'No-God'

H, I'm afraid I can't follow that thinking at all. The entity is still somewhat mysterious, but from what we've heard sofar it seems clearly aligned as an unprecedented evil. It's very coming into the world heralded worldwide baby stillbirth...[/quote:v1vwg0vv]

I can understand the position, and there's nothing wrong with it, but i still not casting my judgement on the No-God until i at least understand the Consult's ultimate objective. Scott does such a good job of painting everything but the Consult in shades of grey, that i can't help but feel that he's setting us up for a real suprise when we learn both the No-God's nature and objective. I could be completely wrong, but this is my intuition and i'm sticking to it until Scott tells me otherwise.

However, i have to admit that if the No-God turns out to just be the typical evil boogy man (a la Sauron) i'm going to be hella disapointed (but i really just can't see Scott doing such a thing, especially given how cheeky he is in teasing us about the real nature of things in his world). view post


Do you believe a God exists? posted 19 August 2005 in Philosophy DiscussionDo you believe a God exists? by H, Auditor

I'm not sure how the fact that one action could change everything means that there is such a thing as free will though. Free will means, to me, that one's will is free to be whatever one likes, i.e. not predetermined. However, this definition leas me to believe that there is no such thing as free will, and could not be. If every effect has a cause, then (since cause 1) there have been no effects which have been without cause. For example, the reason i like vanilla as opposed to chocolate is not actually a function of my 'free will', becuse there was obviously some casue to it (maybe i tried vanilla first, or maybe i'm just genetically programmed to like it more). I don't see have anything (even thoughts) could be independant from all cause and thus free. This also feeds into the idea that there is no such thing as 'random', and this is pretty much true (as anyone who has ever tried to find a truely 'random' number table can attest) as any system which appears 'random' is in fact actually becomes regular over long periods.

So all the decisions i've ever made were actually 'predetermined'as the effect of cause one. Of cource, this is far too complex to even fathom, however. There is no way i could know the chain of chance that brought me to waering a yellow shirt today. However, that choice wasn't random, and actually wasn't free, because (as was proven by the fact that i wore it) i'd always choose to wear it in that given situation. The fact that i have no idea why i chose to wear it, doesn't make it any less determined by that which came before. In fact, the answer could be as simple as, "it was on the top of my pile", or "it was my only clean shirt", but these only further proove that there is in fact no randomness to anything. And the fact that all things are predermined, by the chain of cause and effect.

So in all, i couldn't say if there is a God or not. Since all things have followed cause and effect, there is only really a 'need' for God as perhaps the first cause, all else has followed in suit... view post


Most cruel act yet? posted 19 August 2005 in The Thousandfold ThoughtMost cruel act yet? by H, Auditor

I'll go with Kellhus taking Esmet from Akka. Take what a man tresures most, and not have the decency to kill him? Pretty bad, leaving Akka with nothing but the Dreams and an empty bed, plus the added indignity of having to watch Kellhus be with her too. Ouch. I don't really like Akka much, buit i'm felling that... view post


The Few and Kellhus posted 28 August 2005 in The Warrior ProphetThe Few and Kellhus by H, Auditor

Also a minor point: We don't know if it actually the No-God's intention, or the process of his (it's) summoning/entrance into Earwa (which was basically engineered by the Consult), which caused the whole stillborn event.

Could a baby be born, killing it's mother in the process, and be considered the height of evil? Such could (possibly) be akin to what happened to the No-God.... view post


The problem of evil posted 02 September 2005 in Philosophy DiscussionThe problem of evil by H, Auditor

Well how about looking at sociopaths as people who have little/none/distorted views of what is right and wrong? I think that's about as close as one can come in the real world. view post


The Mystery of the Winged Elephant posted 07 September 2005 in Author Q &amp; AThe Mystery of the Winged Elephant by H, Auditor

It's hard to tell if it's wings or just big ears. The only connection i can think of is The Tusk being that of an elephant. view post


The Mystery of the Winged Elephant posted 09 September 2005 in Author Q &amp; AThe Mystery of the Winged Elephant by H, Auditor

Wow, how...disappointing... <!-- s:roll: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_rolleyes.gif" alt=":roll:" title="Rolling Eyes" /><!-- s:roll: --> <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: --> view post


Question about the ending of TWP *Spoiler Warning* posted 09 September 2005 in Author Q &amp; AQuestion about the ending of TWP *Spoiler Warning* by H, Auditor

Well, it is confusing because no where does it say that he's even near Serwe, let alone that he reaches into her and pulls out her heart. Scott's a competant writer, so he must have left the passage ambiguous for a reason...perhaps to make us wonder about the nature of the transcendance gained from the TT. Is it a physically transformation (the passage littereally) or a metaphysical (the passage metaphorically), or both?

Like Mithfânion says, we'll probably have to wait for TTT to really 'get' the whole scene... view post


Recomended Ancient Miltary History? posted 13 November 2005 in Author Q &amp; ARecomended Ancient Miltary History? by H, Auditor

Following your suggestion for Alexander The Great and the Logistics of the Macedonian Army (which is a fantastic little book), i was hoping you might have some suggestions on books about ancient weapons/tactics. I'm not looking for anything specifically culture based, but i would be most interested in Roman, Greek, Turkish, Egyptian, Mongolian, Ottoman, or even Mesopotamian history. Feel free to suggest as many books as you like, i doubt there be any one that could over all that kind of stuff in reasonable detail. Basically, if it was anceint, and successful enough to conquer a decent area, i'd be interested. Thank for any help!

BTW, suggestions by everyone else would also be quite welcome. <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> view post


Recomended Ancient Miltary History? posted 19 November 2005 in Author Q &amp; ARecomended Ancient Miltary History? by H, Auditor

Yeah, Caesar's Legion was a great book. I'm waiting for Nero's Killing Machine to be in paperback before i get it. Are there any similar type books about Greek warfare that anyone knows of?

And thanks for the other suggestion too, i'm going to check out that McNeill book for my next Amazon order. view post


The Nail of Heaven - What is it? posted 07 December 2005 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThe Nail of Heaven - What is it? by H, Auditor

I still think it would make most sense being the pole star.

Quote: &quot;wiki&quot;:37ok49nr
Pole stars are often used in celestial navigation. While other stars' positions change throughout the night, the pole stars' position in the sky does not. Therefore, it is a dependable indicator of the direction north.[/quote:37ok49nr]

The moon and venus, or even the milky way wouldn't be static in the sky, i don't think (i'm no astronomer). The name Nail of Heaven implies that it is stationary which, to me, imples it could only be a pole star... view post


Another silly review posted 07 December 2005 in The Thousandfold ThoughtAnother silly review by H, Auditor

Man, January can't come fast enough! view post


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