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Alric Auditor | joined 04 August 2004 | 147 posts


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 30 August 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

Cement Block (long story) view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 31 August 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

Crazy view post


Now listening to... posted 31 August 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow listening to... by Alric, Auditor

Yardbirds were a great band, in most of their iterations. Great songs even if most people aren't familiar with them.

Having a Dylan sort of day myself. view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 01 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

mystery view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 03 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

Shock view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 07 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

Pale view post


What other sites are you active on? posted 07 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionWhat other sites are you active on? by Alric, Auditor

I'm primarily active on wotmania.com, where I am an admin of the Other Fantasy sections and the Writers' Message Board.

I'm more active here than I am at the malazan forum, primarily because it's newer and really still developing. As for other places, I pop in many places every once and a while.

Oh, Larry didn't mention this, but we have a Blog site as well that links to wotmania, OF Blog of the Fallen. It's a place that lets us approach topics and discussions in a different way than many of the sites we are active on. Check Aldarion's sig for the address. <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> view post


Now Reading... posted 07 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Alric, Auditor

Currently reading...

Dan Simmons' Ilium, a re-read, in preparation for the Book Club discussion that I'm running on wotmania.com on 13 of September.

Ian MacLeod's The Light Ages it has been slow going due to my own lack of time. view post


What subgroup of speculative fiction do you prefer? posted 07 September 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat subgroup of speculative fiction do you prefer? by Alric, Auditor

I'm not a big fan of categorization myself, and I rarely categorize in my own mind what it is I'm reading. A lot of what I read seems to fall between several of the generally accepted terms. Authors like Mieville, Gaiman, MacLeod, Simmons, DeLint, Wolfe, to name a few seem to be able to blend the boundries, create new rules and simply let the story flow where it may.

So, what I most like to read are well-written stories. Whether or not the story is set in a dystopic, near-future or a mythical, magic filled created world of dragons doesn't matter to me as long as the story is well-written, well-crafted, populated with interesting and accessible characters. view post


Ilium posted 07 September 2004 in Literature DiscussionIlium by Alric, Auditor

A reminder:

I'll be hosting a book club discussion of Dan Simmons' Ilium on Monday, September 13, at wotmania.com. Below is a link to the announcement post I made on wotmania if you'd like to check it out, see some of the suggested discussion topics, etc.

[url:3tiamjee]http&#58;//www&#46;wotmania&#46;com/fantasymessageboardshowmessage&#46;asp?MessageID=104788[/url:3tiamjee] view post


Alright, our first book club discussion is going to be posted 07 September 2004 in Book ClubAlright, our first book club discussion is going to be by Alric, Auditor

I'm not online at all on weekends. Though, with a smaller site like this, this discussion should last quite some time, so I can get in on the action a few days after it has been started. view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 07 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

Stand (as in The Stand) view post


Now Reading... posted 08 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Alric, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Taliesin&quot;:dlkqi9av
And, I'm sort of reading Gates of Fire by Steven Pressfield, about the battle of Thermopylae. Read 5 pages of that one while eating my lunch today....

School sure does screw up my reading schedule <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: -->

Though, it does bring about the interesting experience of simultaneously reading Ilium and the Iliad.[/quote:dlkqi9av]

Gates of Fire is a very good historical fiction read. I think it should appeal to most fantasy readers, especially fans of Steven Erikson.

As for reading Ilium and the Iliad at the same time, well, that should be interesting if nothing else. view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 09 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

score

(no) view post


Is the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? posted 09 September 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionIs the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? by Alric, Auditor

Interesting conversation so far. There has been a little bit of a whole lot expressed in the many responses. There has been Scientific Realism, Nihilism, Post-Structuralism, creationism vs evolution, even a little Christian Apologetics.

Let me address the original question first. Are we inclined to believe in some sort of primary orginator(s) outside the realm of chance and chaos? Yes, I point to the overwhelming evidence of history to show that each and every society, that we have reasonable information on, had some sort of rationalization of existence that included a God or primary being. While these images and stories varied, the fact that humans of all sorts and in all locations held to these stories should weigh strongly on the nature of our thought process. We seem to be designed to seek out some source, some meaning or process that explains origination and purpose. Pre-scientific people obviously explained things mystically. Science is the active seeking of knowledge and understanding of the world and universe around us.

Now, I have no problems admitting that I am Christian, and as such believe that God created all things. However, I am not one that ascribes to the literalization of Genesis to form a psuedo-sceintific "theory" known as creationism. Now if you want to get into the different discussions around the biblical texts, pre-scientific creation myth vs scientific fact (Genesis creation as a factual step by step account), differences in understanding within the Christian community... well, that is another series of posts.

As a Christian, I have nothing against science, and in fact feel that science is a vital and important practice. I agree Scott, that science offers a great deal and that as an approach that is self-corrective, or at least it is when working properly, is a great deal more useful in discussion and study than blind fanaticism. However, science is not without it's certain delusional blind spots on occasion. All human endevours are, as we are truly incapable of true objective disconnection.

Evolution is a wonderful theory, a theory that carries a lot of weight, a theory that is becoming ever more political within the scientific community it seems. Now, I certainly believe that animals/organisms can change and adapt over time due to genetic mutation, adaption, etc. However, I recognize that evolutionary theory has gaps in it as well. I look to some of the more recent developments and studies being produced by those supporting a somewhat newer scientific theory termed Intelligent Design. Now, I want to point out that this is not a Christian theory, though many Christian scientists do work in this area, but a scientific one where meta-physical discussion is left behind, at least for the most part. I do not bring this up to criticize evolution so much as I bring it up as a point that science does look at itself when new and conflicting evidence comes to light. It is really quite exciting.

Anyway, I thought I'd weigh in since Larry (Aldarion) has been prodding me to get involved in these discussion. Thanks, Larry. <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> view post


Is the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? posted 10 September 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionIs the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? by Alric, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Grantaire&quot;:382p0sw4
Good to see you join in Alric <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: -->

Now, I have no problems admitting that I am Christian, and as such believe that God created all things. However, I am not one that ascribes to the literalization of Genesis to form a psuedo-sceintific "theory" known as creationism. Now if you want to get into the different discussions around the biblical texts, pre-scientific creation myth vs scientific fact (Genesis creation as a factual step by step account), differences in understanding within the Christian community... well, that is another series of posts.


If you don't mind my asking you, why exactly do you believe that?[/quote:382p0sw4]

I'd be happy to, but you'll have to direct me to exactly which "that" you are referring too. There are several rather large discussion points in that smallish paragraph, so it'd be helpful if you point me in the right direction. <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> view post


Is the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? posted 10 September 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionIs the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? by Alric, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Cu'jara Cinmoi&quot;:wz4vgbj2


I realize this must sound horribly cynical, Alric, but the problems with intelligent design really are profound.[/quote:wz4vgbj2]

Cynical, not at all. Critical, absolutely. And I find nothing wrong with that. As I said above, I didn't offer Intelligent Design as a rebuff of Evolution, but simply as an example of elements of the scientific community engaging in the very exercise that you called one of science's true strengths, critical self-evaluation.

Your critique of Intelligent Design, as far as I can tell, is mostly valid. I am not a scientist, and would never claim a special knowledge or understanding of the finer details of any of the scientific fields. I am a historian and a reader of diverse materials, which is more than enough to keep me busy. Whatever you want to term it, Intelligent Design, is being studied and even furthered by predominantly non-Christian sources. Now, that certainly doesn't limit the level of idealism many of those indivduals probably have.

As much as I know about Intelligent Design Theory, and admittedly it isn't much more than a simple survey of major points, it does revolve around the issue of complexity. There are a great many specifics in that search, complex proteins, fossil explosion, DNA/RNA functionality and information load. But that is neither here nor there. As I said, I did not offer ID as a thing to be believed, merely as sidenote. I am much more familiar and comfortable with discussions of evolution. Though, as I see it, a definite and not specifically related tangent to the question at hand.

Oh, and nice to "meet" you, Scott. view post


Is the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? posted 10 September 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionIs the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? by Alric, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Aldarion&quot;:2hah2bq5
You've been around me too long, haven't you Jake? <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) --> Nice reply there. Needless to say, I do wonder how one could discuss all of the possible pertinent points (say that three times fast! <!-- s:P --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_razz.gif" alt=":P" title="Razz" /><!-- s:P -->) in one measly wittle post. Wanna try, though? <!-- s:P --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_razz.gif" alt=":P" title="Razz" /><!-- s:P -->[/quote:2hah2bq5]

Geez, Larry. I guess I could take a stab at a nice summary of the points. But, I'm not going to do it right now. I'm about 15 minutes away from leaving on a mini-vacation to the lake cabin with my wife. So, it'll have to wait. view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 10 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

kick (to break up the saying) view post


Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange &amp; Mr. Norrell posted 10 September 2004 in ReviewsSusanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange &amp; Mr. Norrell by Alric, Auditor

Nice review. I read Clute's and another very similar one a couple days ago. It sounds pretty much as I expected. So, I'm happy that we've been keeping this title in the minds of people at OF and here. I look forward to starting my copy. <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) --> view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 13 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

brilliant view post


Is the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? posted 14 September 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionIs the idea of a &quot;god&quot; inherent in our minds? by Alric, Auditor

Quote: &quot;Grantaire&quot;:7tx2m6m2
Alric, I'm referring to your christian beliefs. I don't know exactly what church you belong to, but why do you have those beliefs?[/quote:7tx2m6m2]

Well, that is always a difficult question to answer briefly and in anything less than an actual live conversation. I will try to give you some sort of answer. I don't know whether or not this would be better handled as a private note or not. What do you think? view post


Top 5 Sci-fi Series/ books posted 16 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionTop 5 Sci-fi Series/ books by Alric, Auditor

A short list of my favorites:

1. Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe (really 4 books plus a 5th that followed later)
2. Hyperion &amp; The Fall of Hyperion by Dan Simmons
3. Ilium by Dan Simmons (the second book Olympos hasn't been released)
4. A Canticle for Leibowitz by Miller jr.
5. Dune by Frank Herbert

Ilium might be my favorite book of the bunch, but Wolfe's is a true must read of the genre and any literature for that matter. view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 23 September 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

Stiff view post


Bad, bad book. BAAAD. posted 01 October 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionBad, bad book. BAAAD. by Alric, Auditor

Any book written by a Bronte woman. Terrible!

Jude the Obscure was pretty awful as well.

I couldn't stand In Legend Born by Laura Resnick, and I wish I hadn't spent $2 to buy it used. Not only was it highly cliche, but the writing was on the level of a bad romance novel. view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 01 October 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

without view post


dark tower? posted 01 October 2004 in Literature Discussiondark tower? by Alric, Auditor

For those interested, I'll be hosting an impromptu Dark Tower Series discussion over at Wotmania.com on the OF page on 4 October. It'll be a loose post allowing for the discussion of each book in the series. If you're not familiar with the posting format at wotmania, you can post under different headings without fear of getting a spoiler if you haven't read the final book yet.

I'll post a link when the time comes. view post


A Game of Thrones book club discussion open posted 01 October 2004 in Book ClubA Game of Thrones book club discussion open by Alric, Auditor

On a few of the points...

As a student of English history, I found Martin's use of the history of The War of Roses as a model. It allows Martin to get a firmer grasp on the grit and nature of a political struggle such as this. Toward this end, I think that Martin has made some brilliant decisions. Of all fantasy books out in recent years, Martin's has one of the best balances of political intrigue matched with moments of brute physicality. I enjoyed that.

The fantasy aspects of this book... Well, I can understand why people would say that there was a lack, something missing to make this story and actual fantasy. However, the stark and fantastical prologue pretty much fixes the ultimate "other" sense in the reader's mind. That opening always stalked the back of my mind no matter how gritty and "real" the bulk of the action turned out to be. Martin is writting stories within a much larger story. Winter is coming, and there will be nothing mundane about this coming winter.

Characters... I think the characterization in this book is the best out of the three. Let me break that into a few directions. The character that stands out most to me in the first book is Eddard Stark. He is both dynamic and solid. He is a man of action torn between his sense of friendship, his sense of duty and his love for his wife and family. He is quite excellently rendered. Also, the Imp comes alive as the book goes along.

Now, I think the characterization in this book is the best because I think Marin forces his hand too much in later books, especially in some aspects with the Imp (battle prowess in the battle with the chains) and mostly with Arya. He is trying so hard to make us believe that she is a bad-ass character that it reeks of false effort. She is not consistent with what she does, thinks and accomplishes. As such, I tend to lose interest in Arya as the series progresses.

The nature of the writing is strong in this book. The gritty focus on details and straight forward approach to telling the story wasn't over done in this book. In fact, it provided a great deal of the energy. It gets a bit overdone in the next two books, but that is a different issue.

All in all, it is one of the best first books in a fantasy series that I've read in a long time. It helps that Martin was very much a vetern writer when he started this novel. It showed. view post


Political Affiliation? posted 28 October 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionPolitical Affiliation? by Alric, Auditor

I'd call myself a Kennedy Liberal, which is to say that I would have been a liberal many, many years ago. These days, I don't hold to an association as I think most of the "dyed in the wool" postions are 1 part right to 9 parts wrong. US politics is becoming ever more divorced from the reality of life, social, economic and even safety concerns. It's odd. view post


First Word that Comes to Mind posted 28 October 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionFirst Word that Comes to Mind by Alric, Auditor

ego view post


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