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dusted off in read-only

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Now Reading... posted 16 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by The Consult, Candidate

that last post was me <!-- s:roll: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_rolleyes.gif" alt=":roll:" title="Rolling Eyes" /><!-- s:roll: --> view post


Now Reading... posted 16 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Peter, Auditor

The Farseer trilogy is in my mind Hobb's best work (as either Hobb or Lindholm). I particularly enjoyed engaging with Fitz's character, indeed I have never found one like him, and Regal is an extremely good villain (if that is the right word).
I would actually say that it is almost better not to pick up the Tawny Man Trilogy afterwards, Hobb leaves the final book of the Farseer trilogy on such a sublime note that anything after it fails to work and evens mars the reading of the first few books. Then again, I think elsewhere on this forum people have claimed that the Tawny Man trilogy is really good, so the above view comes with the disclaimer "Only my two cents, nothing more" <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D -->. view post


Now Reading... posted 17 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

The Farseer Trilogy is quite astounding. However, I enjoyed the middle trilogy the most, The Liveship Traders. I both agree and disagree with peter; I do think that there was not necessarily a need to continue the Farseer Trilogy, but once Hobb opened up the story with The Liveship Traders, it had to be told. Also, there is a sort of paternal enjoyment in reading about Fitz all grown up.

An amazing Robin Hobb forum (of which Wil and I are members) is the Farseer Forums at <!-- w --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.members.lycos.co.uk/farseerforums/">www.members.lycos.co.uk/farseerforums/</a><!-- w -->. I highly recommend it. view post


Now Reading... posted 17 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Loof, Peralogue

Ok update on my summer reading, with some opinions <!-- s:twisted: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_twisted.gif" alt=":twisted:" title="Twisted Evil" /><!-- s:twisted: -->

Read the first to books in the new sun series by Wolfe, they where good but I cant realy see where the rave reviews I have been reading are comeing from. Mostly because I feel the central plot is kind of weak, Severian has almost no driving goals except getting to Thrax so far...

Then I read American Gods, At first i didnt like it much but it got alot better after the first 200 pages or so, still think the characters are a bit too much like the characters in his sandman comic. So good book but had the feeling of having been here done that already so not super good.

Then I picked up Glen Cooks Black Company series and read the first 5 of those, liked them alot especialy how Cook manages to do so much with a very simple way of writeing, which makes the book feel like it realy is writen by mercenarys (who don't have the worlds largest vocabulary). Also liked seeing the similaritys between Cook and Erikson, and think its fun seeing where Erikson got some of his inspiration.

Now im reading "view from the mirror" by Ian Irvine (third book at the moment), think its so so, like his world and plot and the characters are interesting but can be very dull at times. But I'm gonna finish the series before makeing my final verdict <!-- s:twisted: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_twisted.gif" alt=":twisted:" title="Twisted Evil" /><!-- s:twisted: --> view post


Now Reading... posted 17 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I'm not going to spoil anything about tBotNS, but I will say this: keep in mind that Severian is not always telling the truth. There is much, much more to the story that is revealed in the last two volumes that make the entire journey much more than what it seems.

Just thought I'd help out, seeing as Wolfe is one of my favorite authors.

And as for what I'm reading now, I'm starting a re-read of Gabriel García Márquez's Cien años de soledad (yes, in Spanish). One of my all-time favorites. Also am planning a re-read of TDTCB in the next few days, not to mention reading more Márquez, Kathleen Goonan (Light Music), Ian MacLeod (The Light Ages), and Carol Emshwiller (The Mount) - all nominated for this past year's Nebula for Best Novel.

And speaking of which, I did finish reading Elizabeth Moon's Nebula-winning The Speed of Dark, which is about autism and the moralities of "curing" this condition via gene therapy. Although it had it's weak spots (I thought the ending was rushed a bit), as a whole, this is a very moving work and one that deserves its comparison to Daniel Keyes's classic Flowers for Algernon. view post


Now Reading... posted 17 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Replay, Auditor

I'm currently rereading TDTCB and enjoying it once again.

The series i read before that though was Steven King's The Dark Tower. Not a bad set of books, and certainly different. Enjoyed it on a whole, though there were some bad parts in it.

I have to agree about Hobb's Farseer trilogy. That has always been perhaps my favourite trilogy. There are not many books that come close to the charactirization achieved in them.

The 3rd series (Tawny Man) wasnt bad either, but i think she lost some of the atmosphere that was present in the first books. There was some returns to old form in places though, especially in the second one.

As for Liveship Traders, i am not really all that big a fan. I enjoyed it the first time through (though some characters annoyed me), but seem to have problems rereading it. Think i have tried quite a few times to get through the first book once again but have always ended up putting it down. It's the same problem i have with Martin's ASOIAF: liked it the first time through, but just cannot reread it. view post


Now Reading... posted 17 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Loof, Peralogue

I'm not going to spoil anything about tBotNS, but I will say this: keep in mind that Severian is not always telling the truth. There is much, much more to the story that is revealed in the last two volumes that make the entire journey much more than what it seems.

Just thought I'd help out, seeing as Wolfe is one of my favorite authors.


Ok i will keep that in mind when i pick up the last two books. <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) -->
It hadn't even ocured to me that he might be lieing about stuff since its written in the way it is. Being vague yes but outright lies no... will have too keep my eyes open i guess... view post


Now Reading... posted 24 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Damaen, Candidate

I'm going to re-read george r r martin's Ice and Fire series, which im glad to see people have mentioned.

probably the best of the "fantasy without stupid hobbits fighting orcs for a blonde with a name like "Everproud" or "Barbiehair" genre, into which i drop Bakker's series. I cant read books that would make people say "gee, gilbert, i wonder if Barbiehair would have won with +2 charisma. Lets play it out in our Game Den. Call da boyz."

Bakker *probably* has better character development on a micro-managment level, something that dissapointed me in book2 (i did read WP in 2 days, tho, so...) but which astounded me in book1 (read it a few times... damn book delays and such). Bakker's character development made REAL people in book one. but Martin has CRAZY plots. You cant stop reading. In aSoIaF main characters were scythed down and you had no idea where the plot was going to go. I had the odd feeling that Akka wasnt going to get cut down in the middle of WP ala Robb, Eddard, Tywin, etc etc etc etc etc etc.

;]

thread hijack? mayhaps. view post


Now Reading... posted 24 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by LooseCannon, Peralogue

I am reading the Drawing of the Three by King. Second of seven in the Dark Tower series.

I love Martin's series but I have to admit that Robb Stark dying was too easy to predict. Didn't know it would be a Red Wedding or anything but it was pretty obvious that he didn't really serve any sort of purpose in the first two books, nor did he have a POV. view post


Now Reading... posted 25 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Damaen, Candidate

for some reason i didnt see it coming. I assumed the rest of the book/series would be told with Robb's war as a backdrop. Meh. Who knew? Oh, you did lol view post


Now Reading... posted 25 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I hate to say it, but when I read Martin's A Storm of Swords for the first time in early 2001, I was actually bored by the time I reached the infamous Red Wedding scene. I just found it to be just another event, just another plot device that didn't move me as the reader. Oh, when I re-read the series in 2002, I found the third book to be more enjoyable from a technical standpoint, but I still find SoS to be the weakest in the series so far. But that's just me, I guess, seeing as others have raved about the book and series for a variety of reasons, most of them reasoned out.

And as for current, current readings, I just finished Ian MacLeod's The Light Ages last night and thought the book was as good as advertised. Reminded me of China Miéville's Perdido Street Station in its industrial setting, but MacLeod takes a different approach, using fluid prose to describe the social class antagonisms in a way that reminded me of Charles Dickens's Bleak House and Hard Times. Very highly recommended book to read if you get the chance.

Also, I'm halfway finished with Gene Wolfe's latest story collection, Innocents Aboard, and again I'm amazed with his abilities to create a memorable and disturbing scene with just a few words. As good as Wolfe the novelist is, Wolfe the short story writer may be just as good or even better. view post


Now Reading... posted 26 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by The Consult, Candidate

Currently halfway through Royal Assasin by Robin Hobb.

Great so far (especially the ending of the first book) but it can be a bit slow in some parts...still has enough action, but nothing that really moves the storyline along.

Other than that, it is a very enjoyable read so far.

Anyone read Ian Irvines Three Worlds Cycle? I have ordered the first 2 books, as the series got some good reviews, and he's an aussie like me <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> . Opinions welcome. view post


Now Reading... posted 27 June 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Loof, Peralogue

Just finished Irvine's first series myself. Can't quite make up my mind about it, maybe i will have to let it sink in for a bit. But i can list what i liked and didn't like about it.

What I Liked:
The world he has built up is interesting and well thought out.
He avoids painting his characters in black and white. And they feel pretty belivable.
The overall plot is good but nothing exceptional.

What I disliked:
I think the two things I dislike about the series might actualy be two sides of the same coin. The first one is that I felt that the plot moved very slowly at times and alot of the books could have been cut to make a more streamlined whole. But I think the reason I feel this is that the main characters are not ivolved in shapeing the plot, but are simply tugged along in the torrent of great events so to speak. So the whole series has the feeling of being fated to happen which makes me lose interest and thus makes the plot feel like its moving slowly.

Hmm that sounded rather negative, so to finish on a more positive note i will say that I definetly don't regret reading the series and will probably pick upp his second one at some point in the future. I hope this was of some help. view post


Now Reading... posted 04 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Almost halfway through Ricardo Pinto's The Chosen. This is certainly a different breed of fantasy. It's deliberate without dragging, with a very richly layered tapestry of cultural traditions that seem to go beyond surface similarities to certain cultures (although the ones that did come to mind when reading this were pre-Columbian Maya and Toltec, as well as shades of Han China). Seems like the main character, Carnelian, might be of a different persuasion than what you find in most other fantasies, yet it's all done with great care.

Nice counter to Matt Stover's two Caine stories, which I enjoyed as well, even if it sometimes reads as a Steven Segal movie improved twofold with more intelligent dialogue. <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) --> view post


Now Reading... posted 04 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Loof, Peralogue

I tryed to read "The chosen" a while back but got sidetracked before I realy got into it. Would be interesting to hear your thoughts on it, maybe it deserves a second chance <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> view post


Now Reading... posted 05 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Kingslayer, Candidate

I am currently Reading The Darkness That Comes Before. After that i plan on reading Hyperion by Dan Simmons or possibly Perdido Street Station by China Mieville.

KS view post


Now Reading... posted 05 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Excellent choices whichever way you go. I really enjoyed reading both of them a couple of years ago and need to re-read them sometime soon. view post


Now Reading... posted 05 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by LooseCannon, Peralogue

I really have to read this Dan Simmons fellow as it seems everyone is reading his work.

Anyway, recently finished The Waste Lands by Stephen King and started King Rat by everyone's favorite Tolkien-basher, China Mieville <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) -->. view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by legatus, Auditor

I'm almost finished with my second read through of The Sorcerer: Metamorphosis by Jack Whyte. I'd read the book out of order before, but now that I've read all the earlier books in his Dream of Eagles series and related material, I figured I'd read it again in its proper place at the end of the series.

Anyway, Jack Whyte's take on the Arthurian legend was really well done. Definitely a good read. view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Just returned from my monthly excursion to the bookstore. Here's what's on tap:

Sean Stewart, Perfect Circle

Jeff Vandermeer, Secret Life

K.J. Bishop, The Etched City

Charlie Stross, Singularity Sky

Various, Cosmos Latinos: An Anthology of Science Fiction from Latin America and Spain

Richard Morgan, Broken Angels

Stanislaw Lem, The Cyberiad

Hopefully I'll have a bunch of great books to recommend to others in the near future! view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by LooseCannon, Peralogue

The Etched City is an amazing book, Aldarion. In my top three books that I read last year after TDTCB and The Scar by Mieville. You just reminded me that I wanted to reread that <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) -->. view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Cool. I've been meaning to buy it for almost a year now, but something would always come up. So when I saw it in the bookstore tonight, I just had to have it.

Of course, my toughest decision will be which book to read first, seeing as just about all of them are receiving critical acclaims in Locus and elsewhere. Seems like now is just such an exciting time to be a fantasy reader. view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by LooseCannon, Peralogue

I agree. I remember back in the mid 90s I had finished the fifth or sixth book in the Wheel of Time series and I just sat back and thought to myself of the lack of epic fantasy or just any type of decent fantasy-type books that were being released around that time. Now Martin, Erikson, and Bakker have come along and Mieville, K.J. Bishop, Vandermeer (in his own weird way <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) -->) are filling those gaps. view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Yep, VanderMeer's an interesting character. Can't wait to see how much he entertains me with Secret Life. view post


Now Reading... posted 06 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by drosdelnoch, Subdidact

Ive also got singularity sky in my to read pile <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) -->

Have read Etched City and looking forward to I think its going to be called Black Dog which will hopefully be out next year. Really want Iron Council now but suppose will have to wait <!-- s:( --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_sad.gif" alt=":(" title="Sad" /><!-- s:( -->

Other than that about to read The God Squad, not a fantasy novel rather one based on a true tale about a guy who's mother dies, father commits suicide and he's left to be raised by Nun's. Ive been told that its very harrowing. view post


Now Reading... posted 08 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Edge, Peralogue

Just started City of Saints &amp; Madmen by Jeff VanderMeer. Decided to give it a try after seeing him recommended on several sites. view post


Now Reading... posted 08 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Taliesin, Peralogue

Currently reading The Little Country by Charles de Lint. I love everything of his that I have read so far, and trust that this one will be as enjoyable. The main character's two loves are books and music, so how can I help loving it?

Soon, I should be reading The Darkness that Comes Before, once it gets here... gotta love international orders! view post


Now Reading... posted 08 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Still hasn't arrived? <!-- s:( --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_sad.gif" alt=":(" title="Sad" /><!-- s:( --> That sucks. Then again, I'm still awaiting arrival of my order from almost two weeks ago of Breaking Windows, an anthology of the best short stories that have appeared on Fantastic Metropolis over the years. view post


Now Reading... posted 08 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Taliesin, Peralogue

Ordered on June 21... I'm starting to get a bit worried, though it's still well within the delivery period amazon gave me.... view post


Now Reading... posted 08 July 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

When did it ship again? Said it could be as long as 16 days when I've ordered from there before. view post


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