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Cities posted 22 July 2005 in Author Q & ACities by Esmi, Candidate

Hi Scott, just wondering if you could give some idea of the size and populations of many of the cities in the three Seas, and also of those of the Ancient North before the Apocalypse. view post


Cities posted 02 August 2005 in Author Q & ACities by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Good question. The most populous city by far is Carythusal, which has nearly a million people crammed in her walls during festivals and holy days. Most of the other great cities -north or south - boast populations in the low hundreds of thousands. view post


Cities posted 04 August 2005 in Author Q & ACities by Erthaelion, Candidate

I'm compelled to believe that this question will either be too direct for you to answer in a straightforward manner, Scott, or it will be simply too linear for your creative psyche to tolerate, but, nevertheless...

When you visualize the great cities of Earwa - Momemn, Carythusal, Sumna, Caraskand, Iothiah - what visual analogies have you come to associate them with from Earth? I'm of the understanding that you at no point set out to make it that simple aesthetically, but on some level, there must be some connections, correct?

To me they're all brilliantly sketched pieces of creative art that at no time mirror any historical locale too closely (except of course for Momemn, which draws the obvious comparisons as the inheritor to Cenei and the gathering grounds of the "First" Holy War), but then we've only seen a few at any length...

In terms of world-building and visualizing, I've always thought in terms of analogy. Whenever I read fantasy, I pick it up and immediately search for clues as to comparable periods and locales on Earth, and proceed to search for reasons why it doesnt quite feel "right" - which, unfortunately, are normally easy to find. As you'd imagine, this left me utterly perplexed after my first tear through tDtCB. It was simply incongruent with any Earth period to feel as authentic as it did! After the third or fourth read, however, I came to grips with it, and began to gather an understanding, but I still stand in awe of your vision.

And the compliments, FYI, don't give you leave to dodge the question. <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> view post


Cities posted 04 August 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by target, Auditor

Well i'm imaginning that Carythusal, being the largest city in the known world, will bear some sort of resmblance to Constantinople (or modern Istanbul), the largest city of the medieval world. Similarly i imagine 'Holy Shimeh' to have some connotations of Jerusalem, but this is all conjecture. view post


Cities posted 04 August 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by Erthaelion, Candidate

Shimeh makes for easy and obvious comparison.

Carythusal, while we don't have long to get a feel for it, does very little to remind me of Constantinople. Ruled by debauched King-Regents and a calculating cabal of magi... The whole "Spires" imagery is very Oriental to me.

Momemn, although it can be compared to an Alexandrian model in my head, is very Constantinople-ish (Xothei makes for obvious comparison).

But I'm sure Scott will have LOTS of light to shed on the topic! <!-- s:P --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_razz.gif" alt=":P" title="Razz" /><!-- s:P --> view post


Cities posted 04 August 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by target, Auditor

That's a very good point. I was thinking in more of the population terms, rather than the actual imagery. It's been a while since i have visited Carythusal though, so i wil have to revisit it and see what you mean. Cheers. view post


Cities posted 10 August 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

When you visualize the great cities of Earwa - Momemn, Carythusal, Sumna, Caraskand, Iothiah - what visual analogies have you come to associate them with from Earth? I'm of the understanding that you at no point set out to make it that simple aesthetically, but on some level, there must be some connections, correct?


This is actually a tough question. The problem is that I've been living in and tinkering with Earwa for so long that I've long since stopped relying on real-world models. Everyplace seems to have it's own groove or vibe or whatever, and I'm continually cannibalizing realworld details that for some reason simply seem to fit. In broad terms, the original parallels are clear enough: Nansur/Byzantines, Scylvendi/Scythians, Fanim/Seleucids, and so on, but everything has become so hybridized that they now seem pretty unique - in my imagination, anyway. It's almost as though I started cooking Chinese, Indian, French, Mediterranean, and so on, but after years of experimenting, the dishes became too distinct for those categories to apply.

It seems to be a very savoury world. view post


Cities posted 01 September 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

With the Fanim loose parallel, surely you mean the Seljuks, yes? Just mentioned it because according to the skill I learned when watching Sesame Street, in the list you gave, Seleucid was the one that didn't belong (time period wise). view post


Cities posted 01 September 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by target, Auditor

Seljuks would be the better fit chronologically and from what i can gather from the text, culturally. Of course, Scott may have other ideas, but the Seljuk model seems to me to be a lot more fitting for the character of the Fanim. view post


Cities posted 14 October 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

The Seljuks don't feel right to me at all... For me their association set would fall somewhere between the Scylvendi and the Fanim. But the mismatch with the Seleucids is right. I clearly draw from a basic Arabic association set, I think, with a few Seleucid frills.

Must you guys make me self-conscious of EVERYTHING I do? <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> view post


Cities posted 14 October 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

Well, the Seljuks did settle down in Baghdad and become "civilized" city folk pretty quickly. They ate up the Ghaznavids as an appetizer and then ruled the Abbasid puppet Caliphs from Baghdad. So maybe Fanim culture is late Abbasids, which would be the thoroughly Arabo-Islamicized Seljuks, whose nobles would be a whole slew of various folks... view post


Cities posted 14 October 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

I'll take that as a resounding 'YES!' <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: -->

Look, just how the hell am I supposed to come across as the way-smart, all-knowing, godlike authorial intellect in conditions like this? It's just not possible. You especially, TH!

Maybe if I went to one of Goodkind's boards with promises of money...

<!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: --> view post


Cities posted 14 October 2005 in Author Q &amp; ACities by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I picked up one of Goodkind's books once and saw a defensive, jingoistic dedication to the "valiant" people of the CIA who keep the darkness at bay or some such hog wash and I promptly put the book back on the shelf and never picked one up again. How can you read the book of someone who is clearly an ignorant fool?!

I don't really know that much about the medieval world, I just know a little because the classics of Persian literature were written in that period. I'm more of a late 18th, early 19th century kind of person. But Persian lit is a cumulative tradition and you have no context for the later stuff unless you read from the 9th century onwards... view post


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