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Why read fantasy? posted 20 May 2007 in Literature DiscussionWhy read fantasy? by Anglobotomy, Commoner

My intro to fantasy lit was through those Fighting Fatasy choose your own adventure style books about 25 yrs ago when I was a kid. Deathtrap Dungeon was the first I think. Those books were awesome at the time. Shortly after that I got annoyed at other fantasy books that just had stories in them. That changed though. I think David Eddings cemented my addiction to fantasy. Prince of Nothing is probably the most enjoyment I've gotten from fantasy in years. Even Martin is getting boring. I haven't tried Erickson so I guess I should based on what I hear on here. view post


Why read fantasy? posted 21 May 2007 in Literature DiscussionWhy read fantasy? by Harrol, Moderator

Martin does have a boring way at times. In AFFC he gives us a lot of details but they are in an almost dry manner. Over the whole I love Martin and would say he is my second favorite author right behid Bakker. view post


Why read fantasy? posted 26 June 2007 in Literature DiscussionWhy read fantasy? by IcarusXIII, Candidate

I've been really into fantasy since I was young. I used to spend time with a bunch of kids who were 4 years older than me, one of them was a massive Warhammer/Tolkein fan and it started there. I did kinda go off fantasy for a while because I hadn't found anything decent to read and I was so unfamiliar with the genre to even know were to start so I went right off it.

I only got back into fantasy when my mums fiance bought me Eriksons Gardens of the Moon two years ago and that was me hooked. Then this Christmas he gave me TDTCB and WP, which after reading another string of awful fantasy books while waiting for Reapers Gale was a breath of fresh air. view post


Why read fantasy? posted 26 June 2007 in Literature DiscussionWhy read fantasy? by Jamara, Auditor

The first series I ever read was C.S. Lewis's "Chronicles of Narnia". After that is was "The Hobbit" and then the "Dragonlance Chronicles" by Weis and Hickman. That pretty much cemented it for me. However I was raised on Sci-Fi movies and D&D. view post


Why read fantasy? posted 29 June 2007 in Literature DiscussionWhy read fantasy? by shiva, Commoner

I'd always been a voracious reader through grade school, reading mostly biographys and WW2 pilot fiction. I forget the name of the first fantasy series but the author was Lloyd Alexander (there's a disney toon based on the 3rd book). Read em all in the 6th grade them moved on the the various styles of chose your own adventure books. After that I learned of DnD and fantasy books were natural reading fodder. I'd actually not read a fantasy book in years except some Brust. I got TDTCB for xmas last year and got hooked. I'll have to check out Martin and Erikson. I'd heard good things about Martin but from a guy who like SciFi channel "original" movies. view post


Why read fantasy? posted 29 June 2007 in Literature DiscussionWhy read fantasy? by Moebius, Commoner

I actually started reading fantasy because as a child I was heavily into mythology -- Greek, Egyptian, Chinese, and Japanese mostly, with stories about the Trojan War being my personal favorite. I loved heros with swords being sent on quests for one thing or another while slaying or out-witting monsters left and right. From that point on it was a natural transition. view post


Why read fantasy? posted 01 July 2007 in Literature DiscussionWhy read fantasy? by Chyndonax, Commoner

The first fantasy novel, or full novel of any sort, I read was where evil dwells by Clifford D. Simak. It was so-so at best. But who really got me hooked were Eddings and Feist. I loved the characters of Edding's Belgariad and the magic and storytelling of Feist.

As why read fantasy instead of other genres? I read fiction for entertainment and escapism. Can't get farther away than another reality and the differences as well as the situations they lead to are pretty entertaining. view post


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