Three Seas Forum

the archives

dusted off in read-only

  •  

What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Oh, and what would you say is appropriate length for an average thesis paper? view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

For a thesis? 50-150 pages, double-spaced. I cheated and didn't write a thesis, because I had decided after my first year to take the terminal MA program and then go into education. Otherwise, I would have had to wait 6 months before finishing my MA, because I certainly would have done the thesis in a few months' span, considering the plan was for that paper to be the genesis of what would end up being my dissertation. That's why I see so many holes in it. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Hrm. Well, I think I can churn out 50 pages <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> Yeah, I think my dad cheated by doing that too for his Masters. Gotta love dodging stuff like that <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

For myself, it wasn't as much dodging as trying to keep myself relatively sane. Don't regret my decision one bit. I'm much better off working with disadvantaged children than I would have been working as a history professor now. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Yes, I have to imagine that working as a professor would be a tad bit insane- you don't have to write the papers, you simply have to read and critique hundreds of them. And working with disadvantaged children is really a terrific and worthwhile job. Myself, I got to work for a program called Advocates for the Homeless, where they have workshops for disadvantaged people, to help them get back on their feet. I was basically just taking care of their children, but it was still an interesting experience. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by drosdelnoch, Subdidact

Its good to see that your using your talents to help kids Gran, will probably look at doing something similar myself although wouldnt mind teaching kids at an early age to enjoy learning, I think thats where most of the problems lie in todays world, if you instill in them early enough a love of learning then I think it would aid them in the future with exams and so forth. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 01 August 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Orion_metalhead, Auditor

im not going to college until after next year but do you have to write a thesis regardless of what your majoring in? view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 17 August 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by drosdelnoch, Subdidact

Not 100% sure if you have to or not, I had to although I think the whole idea of it is to partly show what you learned over the years of study. Thesis' are normally given a word count rather than a page number, I think mine was around the 20k mark. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 10 September 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by eowyn1983, Peralogue

Profs. have it pretty good I think. They usually don't mark the papers if there are hundreds of students in the class (e.g. my PSY100 class had around 1200 students &amp; my International Relations class had around 500), they just get the Teaching Assistants to do it. But if the classes are small, then the prof. will usually do the marking. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 12 September 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Where are you going? That's crazy. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 12 September 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

I agree, I wouldn't want to go anywhere with classes that large. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 13 September 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by eowyn1983, Peralogue

I go to the University of Toronto and now I think I've given you the wrong impression about it. Yes, it is the largest university in Canada but at the same time, the classes are almost never that large. Those were just 2 of the classes I've had in the past 2 years there. Moroever, there were introductory courses and to counter those classes we do have seminar lectures that are limited to like 20 people as well as tutorials with 10-20 people. I also should say that those two classes may have been my largest classes but they were also my two favourite classes in my two years at university. The professors really made an effort to get to know the students because of the large class sizes. The psychology professor was so popular and well-known that his lectures were often called "The Marty Wall Show". My international relations prof. made an effort before, after &amp; during class to talk to students personally. And in addition to his office hours we had a class listserv where he would email us with any info. that would be useful to us (quite regularly) &amp; we could email him any questions that we had and he would reply within 24 hours (I personally never had to wait more than 2 hours for a reply). This was all on top of an organized course web page, amazing powerpoint assisted lectures, and really well led tutorials by teaching assistants. He even organized a class trip on his own time to see "The Fog of War" and answered questions afterwards &amp; circulated the pub (about 60 of us went) to talk to all of us after. Large classes can be alienating but it really depends on how you react and handle it. Most of my classes are around 30-40 students, I even have one with only 15 students this year. Sorry about the long post but I can get a little passionate and protective about my school <!-- s:oops: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_redface.gif" alt=":oops:" title="Embarassed" /><!-- s:oops: --> . I've had an amazing experience so far there and learned so much more than I could have ever imagined. It's a scholarly utopia of sorts. <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 14 September 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by drosdelnoch, Subdidact

To be honest with you I'd rather have bigger classes with professors who actually cared about thier work than what I had which was classes around 10--15, you ever wanted to find a prof out of lecture time you only could locate them in the pub, with other profs from thier department and then you'd get told to bugger off as they were busy. Then when you tried to make an appointment they didnt turn up and when the work was handed in whinged because you didnt see them about it. When one tried that on me I took my list of appointments along with excuses that had been posted on their door as to why they hadnt turned up. Needless to say I only managed to receive a pass mark for that piece of work although when another professor looked at it they couldnt understand why it was so low. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 17 September 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by eowyn1983, Peralogue

I can't believe there are profs that unreliable! Don't you do prof. evaluations at the end of the year? Isn't there someone you could appeal the mark to? It sounds like that prof. had a personal grudge against you... <!-- s:( --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_sad.gif" alt=":(" title="Sad" /><!-- s:( --> That's horrible...I know there are profs. like that around but I hope I don't come across any of them.... <!-- s:? --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_confused.gif" alt=":?" title="Confused" /><!-- s:? --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 21 September 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by drosdelnoch, Subdidact

No didnt get the option, if we had I think all the profs on my course bar one would have been sacked and that one was only a hire in guy as the reg prof was off on some soul searching trip.

Still if I were to go back into education I would probably do something with computers as thats the way of the future, the way that my course was done and the fact that it was done in film and media has left me feeling that my degree isnt worth the paper its written on. Never done me any favours in the job market.

If I was given a three years course work as a job lot alongside the projects that needed to be written I could probably do it all in around 4 months. Im meticulous with research and can usually argue any of the course pieces from any angle. Ive written work for others doing them in English, Ive written Anglo Saxon papers, Ive even argued the runic alphabet for someone doing part of their degree of ancient studies. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 27 December 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Anonymous, Subdidact

Aldarion: Yeah, you put Civilization and Its Discontents on top of your list! Read it, folks, it'll change the way you think and is much more entertaining than reading about penises and yellow wallpaper. Future of An Illusion is a classic as well.

Here are a few of my abolsute must-reads (this is so subjective and because of who I am, very Western-centric). The first list I chose for purposes of what, in my humble opinion, you must read to understand the times/context in which most of we Westerners live. The second list is strictly fiction.

Non-Fiction (No order)

1. The Bible - Any version (maybe this should be on the fiction list?)
2. The Prince (and then the Discourses) - Machiavelli
3. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism - Weber
4. Understanding Media - Marshall McLuhan
5. Feminism Unmodified - Mackinnon
6. The Origin of Species - Darwin
7. The Republic - Plato
8. Interpretation of Dreams - Freud

Fiction

1. The Fountainhead - Rand
2. Grapes of Wrath - Steinbeck
3. Lolita - Nabokov (I have the first 2 paragraphs memorized)
4. Everything by Shakespeare (but the comedies are my favorites). Was there a greater Western literary genius? Okay, John Donne was arguably a better poet but Shakespeare was unreal and so prolific. I mean, how many words did the fellow coin?
5. Portnoy's Complaint - Roth
6. The Great Gatsby - Fitzgerald view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 27 December 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Annabel, Peralogue

Oops. The above post is me, Annabel. I posted without logging on - didn't know you could do that. And, is anyone out there?? This board's slow as molasses. Sorta feel like I'm playing the sandbox by myself. <!-- s:( --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_sad.gif" alt=":(" title="Sad" /><!-- s:( --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 28 December 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by AjDeath, Didact

Quote: &quot;Annabel&quot;:1rvwactq
Oops. The above post is me, Annabel. I posted without logging on - didn't know you could do that. And, is anyone out there?? This board's slow as molasses. Sorta feel like I'm playing the sandbox by myself. <!-- s:( --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_sad.gif" alt=":(" title="Sad" /><!-- s:( -->[/quote:1rvwactq]Very slow board. It sucks for me because I mainly post on a BB that is always active and is a very tight knit group of members, this place is just the opposite. I would be here all the time, but no one else is, 'tis a shame. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 07 January 2005 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by saintjon, Auditor

I didnt' quite expect the list to look like this. The whole university thing isn't really my style...

I'd say the Book of Five Rings is worth anyone's time to read though. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 28 January 2005 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Annabel, Peralogue

Univeristy approach? view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 05 September 2005 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Fortey, Commoner

This may be the largest concentration of Freud supporters I've ever come across. I'll give points to Civilization and its Discontents for being an interesting read and far easier to digest than any of Lacan's verbosity but...it's Freud. Maybe it's all his insane conclusions I can't get past.

For philosophical kicks I heartily recommend Foucault. I wrote quite a fabulous essay on Foucault and Buffy the Vampire Slayer during my last year at university, it was pretty impressive if I do say so myself.

If you have a lot of time and a sharp mind, I'd also try some Derrida. The reason I say time is that misinterpreting Derrida seems to be a job for some people. The word "deconstruction: is part of the lexicon these days and barely anyone can properly define it. Read criticisms of the man's work and you'll see that scholars take completely different meanings out of his writings. He can be rather complicated.

Also worth a look is Barthes and Boudrillard. They're nutty fellas they are. Boudrillard and the Matrix go hand in hand. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 06 September 2005 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by target, Auditor

Barthes is good, so are most of the structuralists though. Need to look into Boudrillard, need to look into most things, never have the time. Oh well, must plod on. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 06 July 2006 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by thegreenman, Candidate

Everyone should read at lest these two Dumas stories.

The Man in the Iron Mask
The Three Musketeers view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 06 July 2006 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Tol h'Eddes, Auditor

Quote: &quot;thegreenman&quot;:3fltm5g6
Everyone should read at lest these two Dumas stories.

The Man in the Iron Mask
The Three Musketeers[/quote:3fltm5g6]

I agree ! And Twenty years after, sequel to the Three Musketeers.

I would also recommend The Cursed Kings (Les rois maudits) by Maurice Druon.

Good Reading ! view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 25 July 2006 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Angrion, Commoner

Here are my top books (excluding the Prince of Nothing series)

1-Myst, Book of Atrus
2-Jurrasic Park (yes, the book is well worth the read)
3-Otherland: City of Golden Shadows
4-100 years of Solitude

Those are all I can think of during this our of late <!-- s:P --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_razz.gif" alt=":P" title="Razz" /><!-- s:P --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 01 August 2006 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Ismellofhockey, Commoner

I'll try and keep my list to Fantasy/&quot;cap et épée&quot; novels, I think it gets too crowded if every category is included. No order:

Lord of the Rings (The Hobbit &amp; everything else)
Les rois maudits
Le comte de Monte Cristo
Les trois Mousquetaires (20 ans après, Le vi-comte de Bragelonne... I think they recently published a lost work of his too.)

The Dragonlance Chronicles and Chronicles of Narnia deserve mention for younger readers. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 02 August 2006 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by gierra, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Quote: &quot;Ismellofhockey&quot;:2uun0gm9
The Dragonlance Chronicles and Chronicles of Narnia deserve mention for younger readers.[/quote:2uun0gm9]

younger! bah! i'm reading the dragonlance chronicles right now.. <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 04 August 2006 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Ismellofhockey, Commoner

perhaps I should have defined younger but on second thought I'll refrain from doing that and just say I really enjoyed those books, they can be read at any age but like the Hobbit they seemed (to me at least) aimed at a younger audiance. But I re-read the Hobbit last year and still enjoyed it very much. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 04 August 2006 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by alhana, Auditor

I believe that C.S. Lewis's Narnia books were written for his step-son Douglas, who ended up backing the Disney release of the movie last Christmas. They were indeed aimed at children, but they endure as loved by adults as well. U.S. children might have some difficulty as a good portion of the books have references to words and phrases used in the UK.

Tolkien, on the other hand, is very complex story. The Hobbit is the easiest of all to read, but all of them still have detailed discourses and poems and other elements that might be a little challenging for some students younger than 14. When one begins to study the other books of history and lanuages that Tolkien used in his work, there is a much broader base of information to read and disseminate. Again, I believe that Tolkien appeals to readers of all ages and can be enjoyed over and over as one learns about the world that he created.

It strikes me that few books written today are both appealing to children and adults. The closest thing I have seen would be Rawling's Harry Potter series. While a lot of folks have ranckled that her writing is too simple and her series is not to be taken seriously by adults, I disagree. I have read all 6 of her books along with my young reader and after Book 4 Goblet of Fire, the series became decidedly more mature. Like Lewis, her books are aimed at young readers, but have elementals of grief and lose and falling in love and overcoming great challenges that appeals to adults. The best thing that has come out of this series is that kids are engrossed in a really good book and are reading again. The last two summers that she released books, the hospitals in certain neighborhoods in England reported almost a 100% drop in &quot;kid&quot; related ER visits the weekends before and after her book was released! The kids were all inside reading!!!!! Not exactly &quot;hard evidence&quot; but it does seem that a good book can still transport even the minds of a generation that has grown up on Ninetendo and Xbox. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 04 August 2006 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by gierra, Sorcerer-of-Rank

i just like kids books. view post


  •  

The Three Seas Forum archives are hosted and maintained courtesy of Jack Brown