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What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 26 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

As in, books that should be read by everyone at some point, maybe even deserving multiple reads. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 26 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Kingslayer, Candidate

A Song of Ice and Fire
Lord of the Rings


You MUST read them....or else! view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 26 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Orion_metalhead, Auditor

Lord Of The Rings

Shakespeare, though we are forced to read it in school it sorta takes away the importance of it. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 27 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Yeah Orion, I agree that having to read books in school takes away the fun in them. Having to dissect them for a class makes you hate them, whereas if you can just think about it at your own pace, it makes them far more enjoyable. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 27 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by FuraxVZ, Candidate

Darnit, I've lost my list of 'The Ten Books You Have to Read' I made a while back. It was actually a struggle to limit myself to ten and still sample a little of everything.

Here's a few off the top of my head (and in no order):

Proust's In Search of Lost Time (and I'll cheat and call all books just one)

Tolstoy's War and Peace or Anna Karenina (you get to pick whether you like war or romance)

Orwell's 1984 (though I like Animal Farm better)

Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (not a novel, but great commentary on history. . . beyond just the Romans too.)

Then I start thinking of naming lots of Asian masterpieces that no one reads like The Tale of Genji and The Romance of the Three Kingdoms, etc. As I said, very difficult to pick what MUST be read; there's so much! view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 27 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Yes, I know Furax, there are so many that can be chosen from. Feel free to say as many as you wish though, don't feel obligated to limit your list <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 27 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Personally, I think it's not so important what you get read so long as you read for life and sample diversity. I figrue that way you're bound to get the important ones. <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 27 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by FuraxVZ, Candidate

Quote: &quot;Sovin Nai&quot;:2duo0tr4
Personally, I think it's not so important what you get read so long as you read for life and sample diversity. I figrue that way you're bound to get the important ones. <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D -->[/quote:2duo0tr4]

Haha <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) --> But as I get older, I am less tolerant of reading crap. <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I'm not saying you should read everything you pick up. But pick up everything you hear good or controversial things about. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Loaded question. In one sense, I'd say nothing is for everyone, but that many things are for many people. But if you were to ask for books that were meaningful for individual people here, I might reply as follows:

For religious/cultural purposes, works like the Bible and commentaries on it and other religious texts.

Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents, even if I disagree with most of Freud's conclusions. The idea of a Thanatos/Eros duality is interesting.

Modris Eksteins, The Rites of Spring, if only to see the outrage that causes among many historians <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) -->

Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish - this is my favorite of the many works of his I've read

Carlo Ginzburg, The Cheese and the Worms, fascinating microhistory that presages the current battles in cultural history today.

Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre - sometimes "reality" is stranger than fiction.

E.P. Thompson, The Making of the English Working Class; Customs in Common - THE founder of modern social history, if any can claim that title.

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto - look for an annotated edition and do not read Stalinism into it, as it's a totally different creature. I'm often sympathetic to Marxism, especially neo-cultural Marxism, so that's a bit of bias to consider (imagine me admitting this elsewhere <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) -->)


And those are a few of the non-fictional texts. I probably can and should name at least a couple hundred of those before even attempting the fictional (damn those categories of writing!). view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Interesting choices Larry, again, more to add to the stack <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D -->

And oh yes, I had a question for you. Are Foucault, Lacan, and Derrida the three *main* writers of postmodernism? What are their most important books (other than Foucault's Archaeology of Knowledge, Lacan's Ecrits, and Derrida's Of Grammatology, because I've gotten them). See, for my school, we have to do something called a "graduation project" to graduate, (they just came up with it this past year, so they don't even have the requirements totally figured out) basically you have to spend 128 hours doing a project on something that showcases your talents or interests, with a tangible product, reflection paper, etc. My curiousity and interest has been rather piqued by the topic of postmodernism, I'm thinking I could use it somehow. *shrugs* I'm the sort of person who would rather write a thesis paper than to do whatever else. Thanks <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

No, I wouldn't call them the three main writers of postmodernism, because that is a field that encompasses most every social science/humanities subject. I would say that they are the three main French writers that helped influence the philosophical/historical elements of post-structuralism/postmodernism, but there's so many more that are more important to their respective fields.

But those three are a good enough primer for what I said above. If you're interested in how these techniques have been applied to cultural history, I can see if I can draw up a list for you, but that might take a while. Good luck on that project. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Well, it's the history that I'm really interested in. So if they're the driving three French ones, that would likely work. I'm mostly interested both in the evolution of postmodernism over time, and how time changes the opinions of the three.

If you could draw up the list, it would be helpful, but don't do it if you're too busy with your paper. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

[url:3ix4mxpq]http&#58;//www&#46;amazon&#46;com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0394729277/ref=pd_bxgy_text_1/104-7409833-3282338?v=glance&amp;s=books&amp;st=*[/url:3ix4mxpq]

Buy this, if at all possible. Darnton's book is excellent, as is Natalie Zemon Davis's Fiction in the Archives. Those are two that come to mind now (and I just placed an order for the Darnton and the two E.P. Thompson books I used to own, but sadly I sold them all for porridge back in the mid-90s. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Thanks! They look very interesting, I'll add them to the list <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I must confess that I'm hesitant to recommend certain books because they pre-suppose an in-depth instruction in historical theory, the type of learning that takes place through learning techniques of critical analysis and how to "read" a text. But hopefully these books won't be too confusing. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

An understandable caution. The thing that frustrates me is that that is the kind of thing they don't teach us in english class! I think that would be slightly more helpful to me than the sort of things we do. Any books that you can suggest that teach those sort of critical analysis techniques? Most books aren't too confusing to me, as long as I go at an appropriate pace, and take time to think. But I know that the kind of books you're talking about would probably be more difficult than that. Thanks for your help <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 29 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Problem is, we were instructed in critical analysis by having a few professors ripping our attempts at critique apart. There's not really any books I read on this, more like I was instructed in this over the course of a couple dozen courses in college. So if you really wanted to learn how to critique texts, you'd have to have someone trained in it such as Scott or myself (depending on what you want to deconstruct) challenge you constantly on how you're interpreting the texts. I just haven't had much time to devote toward doing that with people online, but I was fairly vicious in grad school. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

While I'm thinking of it, got an email address that has some free space? I'll email you a copy of a paper I wrote in grad school that'll illustrate my point. Sadly, when I re-typed it a couple of years ago, I left off the bibliography, but the books are in the footnotes. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Oh. I understand what you mean. Of course, since this is just a high school thing (and they don't even have a passing score, you just have to do it), I think that they would be impressed that I even did a thesis, and would be satisfied with my attempt, rather than ripping it apart (even though the latter would be more helpful of course).

And here's the email <!-- e --><a href="mailto:intelligencepolice@gmail.com">intelligencepolice@gmail.com</a><!-- e -->
(hey, TIP gave it up <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> ) view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

It's sent. Enjoy. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Thanks, reading through it, very interesting. Read the question I asked you in my response email though please <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Already responded.

Sigh, reading through that paper brings back memories of weeks of reading 12-16 hours a day through texts in English and German (using the dictionary, of course) and then writing the rough draft over 30 hours in a two-day period. And now I'm doing this craziness again by writing what amounts to a historical critique of fantasy? Weird. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

The even wierder thing is that I'm looking forward to doing things like that. Simply put, high school offers nochallenges, at least yet. I want challenge, so putting myself to a difficult project will be certainly interesting. Did you not like doing all that reading and writing in college and grad school? view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I liked it, but I was doing so many different things at once that I just depleted a lot of energy. For example, I took 18 hours of classes and here's what they were:

German 101 (Beginning)
Political Science 355 (Latin American Politics in the 20th Century)
Economics 100 (Economic thinkers)
History 482 (English Revolution)
History 251 (Honors American History)
History 330 (Early English History)

I had 5 papers and a translation project due in a week's period. I only got 3 hours of sleep over 4 days working on all that during finals period. I was driven home (a 3 hour drive) by a friend, where I promptly went to my bedroom, collapsed on the bed, and did not wake for almost 17 hours. That's how bad it was. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Ouch <!-- s:( --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_sad.gif" alt=":(" title="Sad" /><!-- s:( --> That sounds absolutely crazy- never again will I have grounds to complain about assignments <!-- s:shock: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_eek.gif" alt=":shock:" title="Shocked" /><!-- s:shock: --> er..that's the part of grad school that I'm not looking forward to <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> though I wouldn't mind just skipping the rest of high school <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

That was my undergraduate course load for the first part of my Junior year. My MA classes involved about triple to quadruple the work each semester compared to that. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Oh. Good lord, that's even more insane. And I thought that doing an hour of math was hell <!-- s:oops: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_redface.gif" alt=":oops:" title="Embarassed" /><!-- s:oops: --> Well, the good thing is that you learned a lot, and in the long run, that matters more than the amount of work done I suppose. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

And to think that I used to think that I slacked off in college for only studying/reading texts for only 3-4 hours a day/night rather than the 6-10 hours some would have put into that. It's all a matter of perspective and how you handle things. I pushed myself hard and I guess things turned out okay. view post


What would you say are the must-reads of literature? posted 30 July 2004 in Literature DiscussionWhat would you say are the must-reads of literature? by Grantaire, Moderator

Yep. Look what it made you today- you're a brilliant history guy. It's all in the perspective. view post


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