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On The Warrior Prophet posted 16 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by LooseCannon, Peralogue

Back to the AI discussion (Sorry, I am a terrible philosopher):
One of my teachers last semester gave us an interesting final lecture on the state of computer technology and where it is headed in the next hundred years. According to Moore's law integrated circuits will continue to double in efficiency every year. While some argue that this theory is no longer valid the fact of the matter is that when you think about how fast a computer processor is now and you start doubling that capability and then doubling it again and again and again you are talking about incredible advancements. By the end of the 21st century some of the things we've seen in movies like the Matrix and other cheesy sci-fi movies will be reality. Also, with all the advancements in nanotechnology processors will finally have the ability to transfer data at speeds that compliment them. I think it is also going to reduce prices on many technological devices by a considerable margin. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 17 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

I remember rooting around on the web trying to find a crossword answer and stumbling across this crazy religion where the member(s) thought the sacred purpose of mankind wasn't to worship God but to MAKE him. He called it the 'Artilect' (I ended up writing a short story of the same name).

Anyway, the argument he used was almost identical to yours, LC. The upshot seemed to be that we were doomed to make God, whether we wanted to or not. Reminds me of Herbert's 'Ship' books...

There's a growing literature out there on something called the 'singularity,' which, if I remember correctly, has to do with the point at which our technological advances are so radical we simply cannot predict that anything we're presently familiar with (such as our humanity) will abide in any recognizable form. Supposedly it's just around the corner... view post


Other authors you enjoy posted 17 February 2004 in Author Q & AOther authors you enjoy by Kellais, Commoner

@ Cu'jara - Your last post is just brilliant <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: --> I really had to lmao! You're soooo right!!
Personally I don't give a damn about the "official" critics. Come on, they have to find something to criticize. Or else they wouldn't have a job, right <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> I inform myself via amazon for example. They have a topic "customers who bought this book bought also..." Normally you can't go wrong with that. And then there are such places like this here! A Lot of good recommendations...I wouldn't have heard about your book if I haven't read SE's latest interview at that time....but back to the topic of your last post... <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: -->
If you had left out all the "showing a woman in bla bla situation" then you would have probably got a bashing from a male reviewer saying that "Mr. Bakker seems to be a feminist himself". I think you get my meaning <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: -->
If it's worth something, I REALLY love your writing...keep it up that way and you will have found a permanent reader...

Have to go...

Kellais view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 17 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I think morality is as simple as looking around and saying what do I want out of life? When a collective group of people, or animals (which is all we really are) asks themselves this question, the average response is what determines morality. Honestly, that is all we do now, and theoretically that should be all that is needed. If a majority of people feel a certain way, then they will set a moral standard.

There may not be a rational definition of morality because morality is a construct of humanity. But simultaneously, no faith in anything other than the logic of common desire is required for this model to work.

The technology thing is actually quite frightening when you really think about it. view post


What are you most looking forward to? posted 17 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AWhat are you most looking forward to? by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Your mention of religion made me think: I would like to learn more about the cultic religions and how they are related to the tusk, etc. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 17 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

I see what you're saying, and very many people hold this view, but I'm not sure they're comfortable with the consequences.

For instance, when the Nazi's looked around, and decided they wanted to exterminate all the Jews, cripples, Gypsies, and homosexuals they found, were they right? If right and wrong are just what everyone within a society takes them to be, then it would seem the Nazi's, given their society, were quite right to murder those millions of people. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 17 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Yes, within their smaller society they were right, and historically many peoples have been enslaved and abused due to a society's standards. However, just as we now have equal rights for blacks and other racial groups, as world culture expands the standards of morality will broaden to include and ever larger sphere of peoples. We now must look at the entire world when we think about a majority of human desires. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 17 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

And if the entire world goes Nazi? view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 17 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by LooseCannon, Peralogue

The problem here is that the Nazis, as a society, didn't possess what most societies do have and that is a shred of honour or respect for your enemy. They systematically killed men, women and children in brutal gas chambers. I can't understand how they could look past this and still say "We are doing the right thing, the rest of the world is wrong in this". view post


kellhus == good guy?? posted 17 February 2004 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by Malarion, Candidate

I don't think he did. Bakkar cleverly never revealed any concrete facts about Kellhus. He has allowed us to build up our own opinions/prejudicies about this facinating character. view post


kellhus == good guy?? posted 18 February 2004 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by Mithfânion, Didact

Anasurimbor Kellhus has to rank up there in my all-time top three of favoriet characters. Whenever I think of him it's an image of some lone figure standing on a hill, cloak and hair blowing in the wind, ominous aura included. Just seems to fit <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) --> view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 18 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

But that really doesn't matter in terms of Scott illustrating his point. He is saying that if the entire world believes one way, that way can still be deemed wrong by us. This comes back to a majority dominating a minority. Just because a minority is a minority does not mean they have no rights.

I know I just argued against myself, but I feel the point here is finding an answer, not "winning."

Back to my side: do you think the entire world would ever be subject to such a shift? Maybe the varying factions will always ensure that on a global scale we have an acceptable standard of morality. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 18 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

The thing is that on your account it doesn't matter one whit which way the world goes: no matter what, it'll be the 'right way,' whether we ban the harm and consumption of animals, or start dicing our children up for our salads. There's no society-independent (which is to say, objective) yardstick. And this, I think, is just another way of saying there's no such thing as right or wrong.

I can argue against you, Jack, because I think you're not willing to accept the consequences of your initial commitments, but I couldn't argue against him because he WAS. Since I sincerely wanted, as you do, the BEST answer rather than MY answer, I was forced to concede. The reason was all on his side. Nevertheless, I REFUSE to accept his conclusions. So all I have left is my crummy minimalist faith in 'something more.'

It can be depressing. view post


Other authors you enjoy posted 18 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AOther authors you enjoy by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Thank you, Kellais! I really think you'll enjoy TWP... Or at least I hope <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: --> view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 18 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I understand what you're saying...

I simply can't make myself believe, or 'let go' and believe... I can't believe. It is sort of depressing. view post


We Got Permissions posted 18 February 2004 in General AnnouncementsWe Got Permissions by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

We finally got permissions from the publisher to use the artwork from the book on the forum, and so we have switched over the forum to a theme utilising cover elements. I hope you enjoy them, and if you have any feedback please post away! view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 19 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

So you're a nihilist, then? view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 19 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I did some research on nihilism. I don't necessarily agree with everything I found, but I would have to say that in general yes, I am.

I have been thinking about this and I would have to say that I believe there is no higher law or moral code. However, I simultaneously believe in a personal set of moral codes, and believe that as a society we require morals. My personal morals are (of course) based on my parents morals, which were based on their parents' which were based on church. So I therefore indeirectly derive my moral codes from a western christian source. But, I don't believe in God and I don't follow my morals based on any fear of retribution, but more out of what feels right to me to do to other humans.

That leaves the moral system of the world in a scary postion, because it assumes that all morals really are are the current opinion of a group of people. I have to say that I agree.

In objective terms, the only difference between killing an ant and killing a human, is that other humans could cause you grief for doing the latter. For him, there were literally no crimes where there were no witnesses.

I agree that objectively they are the same thing, but as a human I take offense to the one and not the other. In this way they are made different, and I consider it a crime because it does not follow my own moral code. I do not consider murder excusable, witnesses or no.
_____

Out of curiosity, do you believe a moral code exists for animals? If yes, does it stem from the same source as ours? Or is it the exact same code? view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 19 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

A moral code for animals? I having a hard enough time clinging to one for humans!

There certainly doesn't seem to be any code animals recognize. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 20 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by banditski, Candidate

and i'm sure animals would say the same about us. not that i'm knocking human morals, but pointing out that it's a matter of perspective.

just because you can't see something, doesn't mean it's not there. it doesn't mean that it is there either.

just that "there's nothing that i can see" is not an argument. view post


Woh! posted 20 February 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionWoh! by Elfstone4Evenstar, Commoner

The board looks wikid now!

CONGRATS guys!

<!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D --> view post


How did you get here? posted 20 February 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionHow did you get here? by Elfstone4Evenstar, Commoner

Which link of Wil's was it?


The one at Farseers view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 20 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I guess what I'm asking is if there is a higher moral code for humans, shouldn't there be one for all animals? Animals kill each other competing for mates in some species and certainly kill and eat each other, so it doesn't seem logical that we as humans are so special we have a special moral code. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 20 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Not really. It's not clear, for instance, that animals enjoy anything remotely resembling choice. Without choice, there's no responisibility, and without responsibility, there's no morality. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 20 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

So why is it then that humans are the only species capable of choice? Do you think this is part of the relationship with a 'higher power' of some kind? view post


Men v. Nonmen posted 21 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AMen v. Nonmen by Mithfânion, Didact

I'm curious about this ancient Nonmen King, from which you take your screenname. Is he only a legend or is he still alive at the time of our story? view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 21 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

That's the million dollar question, and as you might suspect, there's a million different answers to it. The simplest, most forceful answer, is that we DON'T have any - we're just another animal species like any other, distinguished by the peculiar nature of our delusions. And though I accept this as the strongest argument, I refuse to believe it's true.

Others would say we have choice because we have souls, or because we have reason, or because of quantum tunnelling deep in our brain, or because choice REALLY is (substitute elaborate redefinition here), and so on, and so on. view post


Men v. Nonmen posted 21 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AMen v. Nonmen by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Legend. Cu'jara Cinmoi has been dead for several thousand years. References to and explanations regarding him surface a few times in TWP, and the story of his wars with the Inchoroi will be included in the appendices to Bk III - if I can convince them to include it!

I actually hope, at some point, to write a stand alone regarding him. view post


Men v. Nonmen posted 21 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AMen v. Nonmen by Mithfânion, Didact

Sounds awesome. I hope you can pull that off.

How's TTT going btw? Things going in the direction that you want? Will there be anything that will differentiate it from the previous two books in any way that one might not expect? view post


Men v. Nonmen posted 22 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AMen v. Nonmen by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

I'm actually waiting a couple weeks before digging into TTT (I'm still decompressing from TWP). I have the old, old version that I wrote some fifteen years ago, but I would be surprised if more than a few phrases survived in the final version. I tend to go underground for periods of frenetic writing and rewriting.

The big difference will be the relative density of the events. Many things start happening within a short span of time. Things hit the proverbial fan. There will also be a series of extensive glossaries dealing with Earwa. view post


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