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Curious if you... posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q & ACurious if you... by Fade, Commoner

I don't have much of an opinion about Tolkien, because I never bothered to read all the books. I think Harrison is overeacting at Tolkien. It's like hatemail how he wrote about the books. It's a little difficult to take him serious like this.

Quote: "Mithfânion":3h7v4jnn
The world feels dreamish, sometimes even having different blurry planes about which nothing at all is explained, perhaps even entered by whimsical magic mirrors and portals. It's translucent.[/quote:3h7v4jnn] I haven't read any fantasy that I was like that (or perhaps I am easy satisfied..?). Not everything has to be described thorough or explained. In real life you can't come up with a explantion for everything either. Also, fantasy is fantasy. The degree of realism may vary and because it is fantasy, there is a license to give your imagination a free run without giving everything s scientific reason. That would break off the story and the fantasy feeling. If I got you wrong, my apology.

I like decent worldbuilding with proper detailed and vast history, a world which takes me back to a different time. Also magic never works for me in Urban Fantasy.
A large amount of history is not needed in my opinion, unless it does the story good. I can find it sometimes tedious to read pages of history, when if you don't read it, it wouldn't make much of a difference. I do like description though. It shouldn't always be to descriptive, but it does help to get into the story and world the author created.

Magic.. Hmm. I don't mind magic..But I think I prefer fantasy with a limited amount of magic, or practical none. Magic is often done to easy. The characters don't seem to have any problem with it, don't get tired, not any side effect and can do all amazing things with keen control. That is too much, it's beyond realism, if you want your book to have a degree of realism within the fantasy world.

And I have yet to read a more overwritten book than Mervyn Peake's ghastly Gormenghast.
I never got complete understanding why it was considered as a classic and masterpiece. It isn't very bad, but it is long and for me a bit of a drag. If you like the writing style, not much of a plot and to follow the characters for years as a hidden camera inside their heads, these are your books. Fuschia and Steerpike were pretty much the only characters that interested me. It did not had the "I want to keep reading to see what happens" value to me. But the third book should never been written. That was the book of "psychologic crisis, the trip of a mental confused teenager".

Just my opinion on things. May sound a little vague, but my mind is foggy. view post


Curious if you... posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q & ACurious if you... by Mithfânion, Didact



Well you're talking about the magic in Dungeons & Dragons games and novels. I don't like that either, for a variety of reasons. Having said that, unlike you I prefer High Fantasy with greater amounts of magic to low amounts, for instance I prefer the use of magic in Steven Erikson's books to George RR Martin's.

I see what you mean about magic going overboard, but I think that the problem doesn't lie with large amounts of magic but rather with not showing the consquences of such abilities in a realistic manner. When you *do* show that, large amounts of magic are all the more impressive for it.

It's the same with fighters in for instance the RA Salvatore Forgotten Realms novels or Martial arts films in which warriors take twenty blows to the head and two knives in their chest and still don't go down.



view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 11 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

I just submitted the revised manuscript yesterday, so I still feel too close to the work to offer anything resembling a reliable opinion of the quality of the work. It's wonderfully demented, I can tell you that much, and may very well be banned in public schools in the US - but then that's not necessarily saying much. My girlfriend contemplated making me sleep on the coach after she read it... 'Who thinks these things!'

My gut tells me people will be blown away, but then my gut told me that people would despise TDTCB!

How's that for a wishy-washy non-answer! Sorry, Priest. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 11 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Priest, Candidate

Lol

by the way, if you just submitted the revised manuscript, that doesn't that mean the release will be later than third week of May?

About what you said about it being banned, it makes it sound a bit as if we're talking about horror, like the book will gross people out. Is that correctly interpreted? view post


Curious if you... posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q & ACurious if you... by LooseCannon, Peralogue

I have read Mieville's Perdido Street Station and the Scar and must say I quite enjoyed both. I like tasting different flavours of fantasy writing and Mieville is definitely at the top of the so-called Speculative Fantasy genre. I believe he is a self-proclaimed socialist and a lot of that reflects in his writing, but if the reader decides to ignore it you can easily enjoy his stories (well, at least I can). His comments on Tolkien are nothing more than a rant. When I read Tolkien I don't sit back and think "gee, this guy is ultra-conservative", I think "wow, what a great world and storyline he has created". Mieville is too political sometimes I think. view post


Curious if you... posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q & ACurious if you... by DrBloodmoney1, Commoner

That was me again. I always forget to sign in to the board before I post. view post


Curious if you... posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q & ACurious if you... by Mithfânion, Didact

As far as Urban fantasy with more magical/mystical elements, I like de Lint for that

Can you give any examples? I've encountered him a couple of times but the combination of him writing Urban Fantasy and the fact that he only writes books with a signifcantly female-dominated cast have put me off sofar. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 11 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

I AM late on delivering the book, there's no doubt about that (my submission deadline was September 30th!). I had 15 years to write TDTCB, and I simply had no clue as to how long it took to write a book when I signed subsequent multi-book contracts. Book writin' learned me real good this year I tell you (I've literally only taken one day off since mid-July!).

At the same time, I absolutely refused to compromise on the quality of the book (I'd never forgive myself otherwise). I'm just lucky that the people at Penguin, particularly my editor, Barbara Berson, are as flexible and forgiving as they are. In publishing parlance, they're 'crashing' the book, which is to say, reshuffling the deck to make sure my cards come out on top. I feel very fortunate.

I can't understate how crucial I think this is. I pretty much have no 'power media' support for either the UK or the US releases, so I needed TWP to come out as early as possible - largely because I'm hoping/thinking it'll generate some web buzz. We'll see...

I'm only half-joking about the banned thing. First, there's the way I've sexualized the old good/evil dichotomy. But secondly, TWP is where the religious themes really come the fore. Don't worry, I steer clear of preaching - one needs to know just WHAT they believe to do that, and I assuredly don't. But I pick away at the big mysteries, and some people are so insecure about their beliefs that they need to continually attack others just to prove the depth of their conviction.

As though believing things really, really hard, ever made anything true. view post


Curious if you... posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q & ACurious if you... by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

de Lint is also someone high on my to read list, just below Meiville, in fact. I typically have problems with so-called post-modern works (and from what I've heard of the New Weird, it sounds like it self-consciously adopts many old po-mo saws) because of all the po-mo reading I had to do for my English degree way back when. I was a Branch Derridean (note, not 'Davidian') for a time, but became quickly disaffected once it started striking me as a technique for never having to say you were wrong (and when I started studying philosophy as opposed to literary criticism). All these notions of the carnivalesque, ontologically subversive doubling, the 'decentred self,' aesthetics of fragmentation, and so on, just strike me as trite. They MAY seem new within the confines of the SFF genre, but they're not.

What you say about the TTA forum is true, Dr.B - but that's one of the reasons I was excited about it, being the institutionalized academic I am. I'm still scratching my head over the whole episode. At one point, I was actually taken to task for using the term 'sci-fi' (the implication being that I was being intentionally insulting (?)). It started with obvious misreadings of my points: anyone can knockdown a cartoon of another's views. When I brought up the principle of charity (which states that you give your opponent's arguments the kindest interpretation possible, so that when you knock them down, you really knock them down) I was accused of trying to manipulate everyone's interpretations (!!). Then things just deteriorated into character attacks - despite my continual apologizing for possible misunderstandings. I hung on for a bit, then just gave up. I realize now that they just wanted me the hell off their board. I'm sure it's up there still for anyone to check out - an epic fantasy thread in Claude Lalumiere's forum, I think. Who know's, maybe I was the ass...

That was my experience with the proponents of the New Weird. Defensiveness like that's gotta make you wonder (I sometimes think I freaked them out because they don't often run into people who have a strong grasp of their assumptions (which I have because I was a 'postie' once myself)). Even still, I can't really say anything about the movement until I actually read the stuff.

And as for politics - I've been called a 'commie' in my day. I just think turning what's called 'ideological critique' into aesthetic critique, or using politics as THE yardstick for art, throws far too much wheat out with the chaff. And I think that if I pressed CM on this issue, he would likely agree. Are TS Eliot and Ezra Pound goiters on the ass of poetry because of their political views? Of course not. Making plain ideological assumptions is a TOOL of criticism, nothing more. Only a dogmatist would make it the point.

There's so much that JRRT does that is so damn interesting. Any work that can move so many, not simply to delight, but to a sense of AWE, is more than simply significant. I really think he's the Mallory of our age. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 11 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I couldn't agree more with that statement. Just out of curiosity, what is your religious bent? I get the feel from the books that you would be an atheist, maybe agnostic. I'm personally an atheist, but at the same time I love reading about religions and religious conflict. I think its because at their deepest everyone wants to believe. It seems to me that having the certainty, or true belief in a god would be one of the most blissful sensations in the world. You are safe and taken care of. I think that is where religion stems from: human fear. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 11 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

I'm an agnostic myself, and I tend to believe that most atheists would jump ship if they saw how far down the rabbit-hole goes. Part of the reason I was late with TWP was that I took the spring of 2003 out to write a short sci-fi psychothriller that had been gnawing at me for several years, the idea being to follow the hole all the way down - to horrify people intellectually as well as emotionally. Science implies far more than the non-existence of God (and it does imply that, though it doesn't 'prove' it). People like to think that science chased religious notions of purpose and agency out of the world, leaving us as the sole preserves of meaning and choice, but the fact is that we're PART of that world, and now that science is making the neuroscientific inroads it is (mark me, in ten years time neuroscience will eclipse genetics as the social 'hot-button' issue), it's looking more and more obvious that we are no exception, that we're the last remnants of the fantasy world inhabited by our ancestors.

As far as I know, I actually have an article on this topic coming out in The Journal of Consciousness Studies some time this year. Creepy, creepy stuff. All I can say is that there's simply HAS to be something more (without being able to say what that 'something' is) if we're to be anything other than complex biomechanisms deluded into thinking purpose, morality, love, and so on, are anything but delusions.

There's a lot more than belief in God on the line. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 11 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Mithfânion, Didact

Part of the reason I was late with TWP was that I took the spring of 2003 out to write a short sci-fi psychothriller that had been gnawing at me for several years, the idea being to follow the hole all the way down - to horrify people intellectually as well as emotionally.

You have a penchant for going off on tangents <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) -->

What happened to the story? Will it come out?

now that science is making the neuroscientific inroads it is (mark me, in ten years time neuroscience will eclipse genetics as the social 'hot-button' issue), it's looking more and more obvious that we are no exception, that we're the last remnants of the fantasy world inhabited by our ancestors

Could you elaborate a bit? I'm not really up to date with this stuff though I want to be, but what neuroscientific inroads do you refer to and why do you think it will become a major issue, topping even genetics?

All I can say is that there's simply HAS to be something more (without being able to say what that 'something' is) if we're to be anything other than complex biomechanisms deluded into thinking purpose, morality, love, and so on, are anything but delusions.

I can't follow the phrase, I do apologize. If there is no God or something else higher than us, what do you think that means? That love and morality are delusions? If so, why do these emotions require the presence of a higher being? view post


Question to R.S. regarding release dates. posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AQuestion to R.S. regarding release dates. by Mithfânion, Didact

I find it a bit disconcerting that Amazon and Penguin are still listing TWP as a Mid-June release. Perhaps they haven't updated yet? view post


Curious if you... posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; ACurious if you... by DrBloodmoney1, Commoner

Since I tend to be very much apolitical, I wasn't passing judgement on Mieville. Just making an observation that he aligns himself with a particular ideology.

de Lint's writing is largely urban fantasy (although Subterranean is releasing some his early stories which have a epic fantasy setting) but much different from Harrison or Ford. He does write female characters very well, and seems to populate his books with strong female characters and heroines. I don't find that this bothers me, because he is a great storyteller. He definetly places magical elements and the characters usually possess some type of power, as opposed to Harrison or Ford who usually rely on the mysterious qualities of the situation or setting to give their stories the 'magical' feel.

If you aren't a big short-story reader, a good introduction to de Lint would be Moonheart, which was one his earliest successes and is a novel. It's pretty good and it is separate from his major setting, Newford. Newford is a fictional city that he places a lot of his later stories in, and the majority of his work that you can find in-print deals with it.

DrB view post


Curious if you... posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; ACurious if you... by Mithfânion, Didact

All these notions of the carnivalesque, ontologically subversive doubling, the 'decentred self,' aesthetics of fragmentation, and so on, just strike me as trite.

I must admit, you've finally lost me there <!-- s:? --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_confused.gif" alt=":?" title="Confused" /><!-- s:? --> view post


Other authors you enjoy posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AOther authors you enjoy by Mithfânion, Didact

I've read you like Tolkien, and Martin as well, but are there are other authors, both in and outside of the genre that you're really fond off? If so, could you say why?

Alternatively, are there also authors within and outside Fantasy that you've been really disappointed with, or would you rather not go into that? view post


How did you get here? posted 11 February 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionHow did you get here? by Pearl, Commoner

Clicked the link in wils signature on the malazan board, cheers will **smiles** im a malazan at heart, but i do need to widen my fantasy base ad read alot more authors, these seem quite good, so ill start with them next..... view post


Curious if you... posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; ACurious if you... by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Moonheart is on the list! Thanks Dr.B.

And please forgive the theory-speak, Mith. They're just a bunch of philosophically motivated tropes common to much po-mo writing. You know how when it comes to fixing, say, historical periods you can pretty much interpret a break or a continuity anywhere (which is why periodization and classification debates are never-ending)? Poststructuralist philosophers and postmodernist writers pretty much do the same: they read discontinuities where the tradition assumes continuities, only in things like selfhood, story, and so on.

The tradition assumes a 'unified self' so 'oh ho!' we must dismantle that... You end up with bizarre, disjointed characters without a consistent motivational frame, and dreamlike, disjointed worlds, governed by the 'logic of desire' or some such, continually calling attention to their 'constructedness,' and so on. These things can be interesting when they're not employed for their own sake (they're too formal (which is why they become formulaic so fast)), or for the sake of scoring worn out philosophical points.

Now admittedly I explore a few similar things in my writing, but certainly not for their own sake, and through the lense of ancient concepts of selfhood, story, and so on. I like to think I have a point - now if I can just figure out what it is!

Jeez, I can really tell I've finished the book! It's like I MUST keep writing or something... view post


Other authors you enjoy posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AOther authors you enjoy by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Your question interests me because it points to a tension that's nagged me since I began posting on this (VERY WONDERFUL) board. Because it would be bad form for me to trash other writers, I'm sure most would expect me to soft sell my negative opinions, and perhaps I should. But the fact is I try very hard to live my life according to the credo of openness.

For instance, the most recent book I completed was The Da Vinci Code - I needed to see what all the hullabaloo was about I guess. Within the first few pages I was laughing because Brown commits one of the oldest no-nos in fiction writing: he has his protagonist fortuitously encounter his reflection so that we can find out he resembles Harrison Ford. Now I can go on and on critiquing this book: according to any number of yardsticks it simply stinks to high heaven. But for some reason it struck a powerful chord with very, very many readers. The easy, FLATTERING thing to do would be to dismiss all those readers (as some version of the 'unwashed masses') - they simply wouldn't know a good book if it hit them. The difficult thing is to step back and try to understand not only WHY so many like it, but HOW there could be such a divide between my standards and those of the masses. This is what I try to do, and as a result I always try to offer qualified opinions of other people's work.

So on to Brown's obvious epic fantasy analogues, Jordan and Goodkind. I feel like an anthropologist when I read their works, always trying to bracket my own criteria in an attempt to see what other's see in it. I do this whenever I read or watch 'unreflective works,' which is to say, works interested in meeting expectations rather than exploring them, and I try to understand them according to their own internal standards, no matter how miserably they fall short my own standards - which are far from god-given.

So, who am I presently smitten by: Gene Wolfe, Caitlin Sweet, JRRT, and Sharon Kay Penman (for the effortless ease of her prose - I would give a limb...). Who am I presently disappointed with: Brown and Goodkind.

How's that for wishing my wash! Sometimes I think philosophy is simply the art of decisive waffling... view post


Question to R.S. regarding release dates. posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AQuestion to R.S. regarding release dates. by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

My editor says that they chose to post that as a 'safety date.' I think I was so far overdue with the unrevised draft that they were sceptical of my ability to deliver the revised draft this week, as I have. The May date is the 'if all goes to plan with that lazy f&amp;%ker date.'

And it will, from my end at least. It's all bolt tightening from here on in - something I seem to have some success prognosticating. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 11 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Tangents? What tangents? You know, that reminds me of the time that...

What can I say? I'M DONE THE BLOODY BOOK, and yet I simply can't stop writing! I know it might not seem like this, but I'm usually NOT the guy who empties rooms at parties...

The book is called Neuropath, and I have an 'almost complete' (this is where editors roll their eyes!) draft. I simply don't have the time to rework it. I have to complete TTT by this September 30th and I'm hellbent to do so...

Neuroscientific inroads? Where to start. There's the prospect of low-field MRI's, (think brain-scanning tricorders) which will allow anyone from governments to corporations to read our basic emotional states, and far more, as the mapping of brain-responses to various events continues apace. Their's the already troubling capacities of TMS - trans-cranial magnetic stimulation - which in the hands of people like Pirsinger at Laurentian university can induce any number of mystical experiences, from out of body to revelations from God. And that's just the beginning. Think truth-compelling machines and the like... The list goes on: for instance, what happens to free will when researchers can determine from brainscans what your choice will be BEFORE you even make it? For us, it feels like we just freely exercise our will, but neuroscience is revealing the neurophysiological precursors (which we have absolutely no awareness of), which determine that 'free exercise.' It gets creepier and creepier.

Regarding God. It's not so much that God makes things like purpose and morality possible, rather it's that he possesses the same general structure of these things, a structure (which philosophers call 'intentional') which scientific explanation dispells whereever it goes. It just happens that with neuroscience scientific explanation is now delving deep into us.

Consider ADHD. Just a few years ago, we attributed the inability to concentrate to CHARACTER - we blamed the kid for not paying attention. Now that we know the neurophysiology of the inability to concentrate, its been removed from the realm of character and been placed in the realm of disability - the kid can't help himself. Responsibility evaporates; it's not a matter of right or wrong anymore. The rub, however, is that EVERYTHING that we attribute to character is determined by our neurophysiology. In short order we'll start seeing things like 'Motivational Disorder' with its attendent neurophysiology, and we'll no longer be able to attribute laziness to character anymore.

To put the dilemma succinctly: Science, which is hands down the greatest instrument of discovery the human race has ever known, is telling us that character and agency are illusory. I don't know about you, but it scares the hell out of me.

There simply has to be more; the question is how do you argue for that more... view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 11 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Wil, Head Moderator

Wow view post


Other authors you enjoy posted 11 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AOther authors you enjoy by Mithfânion, Didact

The mention of Caitlin Sweet is interesting. From the beginning I've seen some booksites couple that book to TDTCB, and having read a synopsis and some reviews I have no idea why. A friend of mine who reads a truly astonishing amount of Fantasy books per year listed her book in his 2003 top 10, which aroused my curiosity even more. Still, there appears to be no sign yet of a UK or US release.

I think you touch on a very interesting aspect, that of certain author''s most peculiar popularity. As puzzling as their blatant success can be (Jordan and Goodkind are good examples, Eddings and Brooks are of similar stock), the interesting thing for me is to make a small attempt at understanding why this could possibly so. For instance, while both Jordan and Goodkind receive regular trashings at many internet forums and columns, both these authors are incredibly popular here in the Netherlands, and people actually think very highly of the books as well as huge sales figures (as opposed to the rest of the online community, where, despite the fact J&amp;G's books sell equally well, there is a lot of criticism on their writing).

Personally I've read Eye of the World and it instinctively rubbed me the wrong way. Very very poor. I've not tried Goodkind, but he's always listed with Brooks and Eddings who are both authors of the sanitized and juvenile Fantasy variety. Anyway, in the end I always conclude that they most be catering to the lowest common denominator and therefore appeal to so many, whereas I simply don't go for that kind of story/level.

Wolfe, I've got The Book of New Sun on my shelf, looking forward to that one. I've read The Sunne in Splendour by Penman, which was excellent and often said to be her best work, along with her Wales trilogy.

Any thoughts on fellow Canadians Kay and Erikson? Any Sci-fi? I don't quite know why but I could see you veer off into Space opera one day. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 11 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Mithfânion, Didact

I have to complete TTT by this September 30th and I'm hellbent to do so...

Yes, let that one have first priority <!-- s:!: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_exclaim.gif" alt=":!:" title="Exclamation" /><!-- s:!: -->

Thanks for the elucidation on Neuroscience, I find that very interesting. Funny how one can be so drawn to mythical Fantasy worlds that inspire otherness and escapism yet at the same time be so interested in the future developments of this world. Perhaps there's an obvious connection ( a desire to be anything but here? But that would be too harsh).

I see what you mean now on the issue of science unravelling character. But what did you mean earlier about atheists jumping ship if they knew how deep the rabbit-hole goes? view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 12 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

&gt;But what did you mean earlier about atheists jumping ship if they knew how deep the rabbit-hole goes?

In my experience, most atheists arrive at their position through some kind of commitment to scientific methodology and its implications. Those commitments entail far more than the likely non-existence of God; it just depends on how far you follow them. view post


Other authors you enjoy posted 12 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AOther authors you enjoy by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

I think Caitlin is simply brilliant, though she writes what I would call 'fabular' fantasy. I really think her work transcends genre - it's literature. She also happens to be good friend of mine (she's from Toronto), but I knew her work (through the OWW) before I knew her, and my opinion then was the same. She's been having difficulty getting international interest primarily because of the 'literariness' of her work. It's only a matter of time, though.

Wolfe is, well, Wolfe. If you're into fiction that gives you that 'intellectual buzz' you'll likely think him messianic (some do!). TBNS has carved out a monumental place in my imagination. My only complaint is that he seems a little too taken with those tropes we discussed earlier - for my tastes, anyway.

Erikson - what can I say? He's my hero! Gritty, sprawling, extravagant tales set in a world as deep as THE world - sounds pretty damn familiar! I still haven't had time to get past DG, though. I hope someday to armwrestle him for the 'biggest alternate reality' championship...

GGK is another hero of mine. But again, my problem is that I'm so horribly under read. I read FT back when it first came out, and I've read the first of the Sarantium Books, but Hegel and those damned Pittsburgh Idealists keep getting in the way.... view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 12 February 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

My personal atheism arises from an inability to believ in anything higher. To me some kind of supernatural existence is illogical and makes no sense, and I think to believe in it because of the resulting implications if you don't is not really a belief, but a fearful claim to belief. I cannot make mayself believe without some kind of evidence showing it to be so.l view post


Curious if you... posted 12 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; ACurious if you... by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

By all means, feel free to do it here!

I am actually quite invigorated and intllectually interested with these discussions, it is a rare opportunity to "chat" with such a studied person.

What exactly is the TTY forum? view post


Other authors you enjoy posted 12 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; AOther authors you enjoy by delavagus, Commoner

Don't forget good ol' George RR, though I assume you've mentioned him in other threads. I view him -- have we talked about this before? -- as a bridge (constructed primarily of salvaged pieces from historical fiction) between 'mainstream' fantasy and 'literary' fantasy. He's perhaps the greatest boon for writers like you and me, since he's drawing from the bottomless well called Jordan/Goodkind readers, while in the process -- we hope -- converting them to the cause of 'serious' fantasy fiction.

I've read almost all of Penman's non-historical-mystery books now. I'm halfway through TIME &amp; CHANCE, her latest, about Henry II and Thomas Becket. The Wales trilogy will always hold a special spot in my heart, but overall I sense no diminishing of quality in her work. CHRIST AND HIS SAINTS was a helluva ride, and so far T&amp;C is a nice complement: its focus on (relatively) few characters is a relief after the sprawl of the civil war between Stephen and Maude.

Chances are I won't be reading anything non-school-related until summer (except for my Blue Heaven work, of course). Yesterday, I tried reading Leibniz's essay On Body and Force Against the Cartesians (or something), and I had no fricken idea what he was talking about. I'd re-read the same sentence three or four times and think, "I understand each individual word, yet all together..." Damn Germans. view post


Curious if you... posted 12 February 2004 in Author Q &amp; ACurious if you... by Mithfânion, Didact

Well here's a link:

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.ttapress.com/cgi-bin/discus/discus.cgi">http://www.ttapress.com/cgi-bin/discus/discus.cgi</a><!-- m -->

I tried to look for the Epic Fantasy thread but couldn't locate it. I see several writers post there, as Scott said. view post


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