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Does Scott have an agent that takes mail for him? posted 12 November 2009 in Author Q & ADoes Scott have an agent that takes mail for him? by Callan S., Auditor

Does Scott have an agent atleast, that you can send mail through to him by? Once again I've found [url=http&#58;//speculativeheresy&#46;wordpress&#46;com/2008/11/26/the-semantic-apocalypse/:34kvjnzo]something[/url:34kvjnzo]by him and it prompts me to discuss it with him, or atleast try and launch mail in his general direction! Except I don't even have a general direction! <!-- s:( --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_sad.gif" alt=":(" title="Sad" /><!-- s:( --> view post


sranc posted 16 November 2009 in The Darkness That Comes Beforesranc by Callan S., Auditor

I think they are being ascribed some capacities here they just don't have in the book. In the glossary I believe it even mentions they are inferior to a swordsman.

What Scotts probably gotten across very well is their shock and awe element of their construction - that's exactly what shock and awe is supposed to do, start making the enemy build up fearful fabrications of your own capacities. view post


Skaeos...huh? posted 16 November 2009 in The Darkness That Comes BeforeSkaeos...huh? by Callan S., Auditor

Quote: &quot;bobby&quot;:u2jj07iy
What I don't understand is how the Emperor knew he was betrayed by Skaeos[/quote:u2jj07iy]
He didn't know. He was a paranoid madman and merely by chance he took the look between Kelhus and Skaeos as some sort of conspiracy, and merely on that alone he ordered Skaeos tortured.

It was hapstance. view post


The eye in the Pick's heart *spoilers* posted 16 November 2009 in The Judging EyeThe eye in the Pick's heart *spoilers* by Callan S., Auditor

Akka just knows alot of stuff and figured it. That's because Akka rocks. Even old Akka! view post


I am a devout follower of Kellhus posted 16 November 2009 in The Judging EyeI am a devout follower of Kellhus by Callan S., Auditor

You find yourself drawn and as you are, you paint over any unknown elements with the same 'wonderful'. You take a rising urge to lay down your life and it makes dwindle and die any instinctual darwinistic scrutiny. You call the absence of this reflex, certainty.

No, I have no point in saying such. view post


I am a devout follower of Kellhus posted 17 November 2009 in The Judging EyeI am a devout follower of Kellhus by Thorsten, Candidate

Well, has anyone thought about this in detail? What does he do things for? What motivates him to do whatever he does? What sense of accomplishment could he possibly feel for getting anything right? The logos is and remains a deterministic paradigm - Kellhus has no more freedom inside his framework than those he manipulates, because there is always a logical choice what to do next, and he is always committed to follow that choice. He doesn't have the freedom to say 'I do this, knowing it's stupid, but it feels right anyway.' His followers at least feel good following his manipulation - but what does he feel? He just schemes and does - he is no more than a deterministic computing engine predicting responses and probable events and following a path of maximized effect. view post


Does Scott have an agent that takes mail for him? posted 18 November 2009 in Author Q &amp; ADoes Scott have an agent that takes mail for him? by Jerako, Candidate

You could always try sending your letter to the publisher. Most publishers will forward fan mail to the author. view post


I am a devout follower of Kellhus posted 23 November 2009 in The Judging EyeI am a devout follower of Kellhus by Callan S., Auditor

Well, I think there are indicators of an emotional impetus inside him, though the indicators are small and the impetus fragmentary. I think it's almost a flaw of the books that Kellhus shows irrational emotion to a tiny degree (which is obviously dwarfed by his very logical execution of it) but the book does not examine it, perhaps trying to act as if it's not there. Given that he becomes the darkness that comes before for most (all?) of the other characters, he still isn't given any author aided character examination (you can obviously look at events and speculate, but Scott isn't in there with you at any point, helping out and speculating with you)

Take when he kills his father - IIRC before he knifes his father, he says 'I am more' (in responce to his fathers words 'You are Dunyain' - and excuse my own spelling here). That doesn't seem terribly efficient at the material level. But at some level of principles perhaps it was - but what principles? What do we see of them?

In a way I think Kelhus may be even more blind to his own emotions than world born men. World born men know they lust and laugh and greed. They can atleast see these things to some degree. But by banishing such emotions, has Kelhus simply left himself with the emotions he can't see? That none can see? The whole thing about vulgar emotions is that they may equal unseen emotions in strength - and are thus leverage against the unseen. And the dunyain have given up that leverage.

Or am I getting too philosophical? Visit my blog so I get income from traffic! There, see, I'm back in the material world again! <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) --> view post


Does Scott have an agent that takes mail for him? posted 23 November 2009 in Author Q &amp; ADoes Scott have an agent that takes mail for him? by Callan S., Auditor

Oh yeah! Thanks! Sadly I hadn't thought of that. My probability trance isn't all that strong, eh!? lol

I'll try it out soon <!-- s:) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_smile.gif" alt=":)" title="Smile" /><!-- s:) --> view post


I am a devout follower of Kellhus posted 04 December 2009 in The Judging EyeI am a devout follower of Kellhus by Athjeari, Peralogue

Kellhus does recognize his emotions, you see this at the beginning of TDTCB at the beginning, and when he watches Cnaiur rape Serwe.
Something tugs at him, and this is made known to the reader. Also, don't forget about when he confronts Aurang through Esmi. Kellhus is overwhelmed by emotion for just a few moments.
When Kellhus says that he is something more I don't think it is in regards to emotions, rather Kellhus has been enlightened by the concepts of the Gods and the Outside through sorcery. The Dunyain do not fundamentally believe in Gods or Sorcery (although you could liken Logos to their God, which I think was Bakker's intent). Also, keep in mind that Moenghus was trying to dominate circumstance during the meeting and one path that he tried was trying to revert Kellhus to his previous mission and way of life back at Ishual.
Moenghus believed that a Dunyain would see the issue from his perspective and hoped to dominate Kellhus at that moment by making him see the issue from his perspective. It obviously didn't work. view post


I am a devout follower of Kellhus posted 04 December 2009 in The Judging EyeI am a devout follower of Kellhus by Athjeari, Peralogue

Thorsten, you propose an interesting perspective on Dunyain.
Keep in mind that Kellhus has no interest in feeling at all. He cares not for feeling good about anything, he is simply trying to maximize his efficiency like you said, but by doing so he is simply trying to further attain the Absolute.
I've always thought this a funny concept within the Dunyain; they are bound by the same problems that they see within world born men yet they don't recognize it. The Dunyain are as troubled with tradition and cultural stamps as any other type of person in Earwa This is seen by their rejection of Sorcery. How much closer could the Dunyain be to obtaining the Absolute if they would have recognized Sorcery from the beginning of their isolation?
Kellhus recognizes at the end of TTT that his entire path has been conditioned by Moenghus, hence he realizes that he has simply been a product of circumstance. I still think it is Kellhus' mission/goal to obtain the Absolute. view post


Skin-Spy Concept posted 04 December 2009 in The Warrior ProphetSkin-Spy Concept by Athjeari, Peralogue

I would like to see this art as well. Is there any place that I can still find it? view post


About the Dunyain... posted 04 December 2009 in The Thousandfold ThoughtAbout the Dunyain... by Athjeari, Peralogue

But we have to assume that the Dunyain would know that similar experiences would bombard Kellhus as soon as he left Ishual. If Moenghus left and learned sorcery, why wouldn't Kellhus? The Pragma would have realized this too. By sending Kellhus they would be moving away from their goal of the Absolute because they wouldn't be self moving souls. Moenghus would be acting upon them. By sending Kellhus, the Pragma must have ulterior motives.

I believe the Dunyain know and have more control over what is going on than we know. Kellhus is merely an instrument of the Dunyain in order for the Dunyain to become closer to obtaining the absolute. It also becomes nearly impossible to speculate, accurately, without knowing more of the Dunyain way of life, especially their power structure or organization. view post


The White-Luck Warrior (Book #2) posted 04 December 2009 in The Great Ordeal [supposed]The White-Luck Warrior (Book #2) by Athjeari, Peralogue

Does anyone know of any news on this book??

I'm trying to keep the message board going by posting a bit, but I am genuinely curious about whether or not anyone has heard anything regarding the second book in the Aspect Emperor series. view post


A research paper on A Prince of Nothing posted 04 December 2009 in Author Q &amp; AA research paper on A Prince of Nothing by Athjeari, Peralogue

I am presenting a legitimate research paper (possibly my Masters thesis) at the Rhetoric Society of America (RSA) on The Prince of Nothing series, and I would love to get in contact with R. Scott Bakker so I could at least send my work to him when I am done.

Does he ever check the message board anymore?
Does anyone know a good way to get in contact with him?
I realize I could try sending a letter to his publisher, but I wouldn't want to send them my paper for several reasons.

Any help with this would be appreciated. view post


The rhetoric of TPoN posted 04 December 2009 in The Judging EyeThe rhetoric of TPoN by Athjeari, Peralogue

I am presenting a legitimate research paper (possibly my Masters thesis) at the Rhetoric Society of America (RSA) on The Prince of Nothing series, and I would love to get in contact with R. Scott Bakker so I could at least send my work to him when I am done.

Does he ever check the message board anymore?
Does anyone know a good way to get in contact with him?
I realize I could try sending a letter to his publisher, but I wouldn't want to send them my paper for several reasons.

Any help with this would be appreciated.
(I realize this is quite off topic, but I am looking for any help that I can get) view post


The rhetoric of TPoN posted 04 December 2009 in The Darkness That Comes BeforeThe rhetoric of TPoN by Athjeari, Peralogue

I am presenting a legitimate research paper (possibly my Masters thesis) at the Rhetoric Society of America (RSA) on The Prince of Nothing series, and I would love to get in contact with R. Scott Bakker so I could at least send my work to him when I am done.

Does he ever check the message board anymore?
Does anyone know a good way to get in contact with him?
I realize I could try sending a letter to his publisher, but I wouldn't want to send them my paper for several reasons.

Any help with this would be appreciated.
Once again, I apologize for the off topic nature of this post, but I am looking for any help I can get. view post


Complaint to author posted 04 December 2009 in General DiscusssionComplaint to author by Athjeari, Peralogue

If you did this for only 6 hours than you wouldn't have even gotten to the beginning(or end if you will) of the proposition.

You need to do this for 7 hours (or days)

The Logos is without beginning or end

1 hr. for the entire proposition + 1 hour without &quot;end&quot; + 1 hour without &quot;or&quot; + 1 hour without &quot;beginning&quot; + 1 hour without &quot;without&quot; + 1 hour without &quot;is&quot; + 1 hour without &quot;Logos&quot;

Obviously you didn't complete this long enough to be able to see/experience Legion.
And what makes you think it would work to substitute hours for days?
If one were to keep a meditated trance for 7 days, I would almost guarantee that the person would experience something. (Not to mention that you would be 7 days without food).
My problem with it is that I don't believe a person would be able to stay up for 7 straight days in a meditated trance. The most I've ever stayed up in one sitting has been about 41 hours straight and I was sooo freaking exhausted. Although I wasn't able to fall asleep as easily as I thought when I tried to go to bed (oddly enough I couldn't stop my thought processes, they were on overdrive). view post


Complaint to author posted 06 December 2009 in General DiscusssionComplaint to author by Jerako, Candidate

Quote: &quot;Athjeari&quot;:16lypvpf

If one were to keep a meditated trance for 7 days, I would almost guarantee that the person would experience something. (Not to mention that you would be 7 days without food).
My problem with it is that I don't believe a person would be able to stay up for 7 straight days in a meditated trance. The most I've ever stayed up in one sitting has been about 41 hours straight and I was sooo freaking exhausted. Although I wasn't able to fall asleep as easily as I thought when I tried to go to bed (oddly enough I couldn't stop my thought processes, they were on overdrive).[/quote:16lypvpf]

I agree. This is why I'm convinced there was some sort of narcotic/stimulant in whatever that was that Kellhus drank before beginning. I was only half-kidding about that. It was vital to imbibe something in to be able to accomplish such a feat. I also believe that the training he recieved before attempting this taught him the rudiments of control that allowed him to forcefully keep himself awake this long. This trance was a partly a test to see if he had mastered that much. If he hadn't been able to use what he had learned so far, for even that much control, which I assume to be much more rigourous, the rest of the training would have been useless.

I certainly didn't need to, but during my teenage years (just a little older than Kellhus was at the time, if I remember his age right)I attempted to stay awake as long as possible. I hit 4 solid days before I attempted to sleep again. Exhaustion isn't even an adequate word for it, in my opinion. That's a level of physical weariness I have never experienced before or since. My mind, however, was another story. I'm amazed that Kellhus was able to maintain mental control for the entire time, for I was quite delusional by the end, in a mind-racing, out-of-control sort of way. I wasn't hallucinating or anything, but I definitely was not thinking normally. I couldn't imagine the effects if one was meditating for the duration.

When it was over, for whatever reason (I can't remember anymore) I couldn't sleep either. It took at least 6 hours after I tried to lay down that I eventually crashed. I don't know how to describe it other than it felt like I forgot how. Four days seemed a lot longer than four days when you don't sleep. It had to be an eternity for Kellhus. view post


About the Dunyain... posted 06 December 2009 in The Thousandfold ThoughtAbout the Dunyain... by Jerako, Candidate

Agreed, Athjeari. We already know that Achamian is on his way to Ishual, I can't wait to see what he finds there. I would not be surprised if the Dunyain that Kellhus thought committed suicide after his departure because of &quot;contamination,&quot; did not in fact do so. Some similar things have been nagging at me for a long time too. For example, for Mo to have sent the dreams to the Dunyain, and for the Dunyain to have acted on them accordingly, they must have accepted the existence of sorcery as the origin of their dreams.

This is total speculation, but I believe that there are &quot;sects,&quot; if you will, within the Dunyain. What I mean is that high-ranking Dunyain (perhaps not even all of them) withhold information from the trainees for various reasons, as in conditioning different Dunyain in different ways). I would not be surprised if they intentionally taught Kellhus (Mo?) that sorcery didn't exist, knowing that it in fact did. (At least their own version of it, since they evidently destroyed the previous sorcerous texts upon arrival to Ishual. Kellhus practices creative sorcery, why couldn't the rest of them?) Only a Dunyain can decieve a Dunyain effectively. As I stated in a previous thread, I believe the Dunyain are breeding for the trait that grants sorcerous ability, because only the Few can survive the training (whether they do so for actual sorcerous practice or no).

Why they would do this, however, I lack the information to guess. Like I said, just speculation. We can only wait until Scott finishes the rest of the series to know for sure. I think he's going to miss his deadline of finishing the Second Apocalypse before the real apocalypse <!-- s:( --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_sad.gif" alt=":(" title="Sad" /><!-- s:( -->. view post


Still active posted 07 December 2009 in Off-Topic DiscussionStill active by Ilyich, Commoner

Just giving notice that I'm still around, I'm sure you'll be thrilled <!-- s:P --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_razz.gif" alt=":P" title="Razz" /><!-- s:P -->

Who else still lives?

Oh well, the forum always experiences an large influx of activity around the release of a new book.

Keep up the awesome work Mr. Bakker! view post


I am a devout follower of Kellhus posted 09 December 2009 in The Judging EyeI am a devout follower of Kellhus by Thorsten, Candidate

Keep in mind that Kellhus has no interest in feeling at all. He cares not for feeling good about anything, he is simply trying to maximize his efficiency like you said, but by doing so he is simply trying to further attain the Absolute.


Well, it seems to me like this: Kellhus has goals. Efficiency is no end in itself, it is a concept which is only definable with respect to a goal. He doesn't seem to optimize his genetic reproduction (he isn't overly concerned about his children, and he probably could have more), he isn't optimizing his survival probability (as Aspect-Emperor, he is far too exposed for that), and he doesn't seem to engage in research in order to maximize his understanding of the universe. But it's somewhat unclear what he gets from following his goals and progressing along the path - he lacks the emotional setup to feel satisfaction. He seems like my computer - readily happy to do stupid calculations for hours because that is his nature.

Attainment of the absolute as a goal begs the question how this should be conceptually possible within the causal framework of the logos. RSB is, in his description of the Dunyain philosophy, deliberately vague on this point. The thing is - if there is a causal chain of events, you need to get out of it to be absolute - but from within causality you just can't.

Much of Kellhus is a philosophical excurse on the relation between free will and causality - the concept in things originating from within themselves without cause vs. the concept of everything being caused by what is before. In absolute causality, things would be absolutely predictable, but there would be no free will left to have any use for such predictions - in essence with absolute foreknowledge of events the future collapses and becomes the present - all that is left is to act it out. But absolute causality leads to internal contradictions. Physics is sort of absolutely causal - but not in concepts we would recognize, just in terms of wave functions and field evolutions. Physics in terms of our experience is not causal, for example radioactive decays are not caused by anything.

To cut it short - I think it is pretty easy to trash the absolutely causal paradigm of the logos or of Dunyain philosophy - and things like intuition and emotions in a sense are a meaningful fix to the shortcomings of rationality and causal reasoning. I don't see Kellhus anywhere on the path of attaining the absolute - he's probably much farther from it than the rest of us, because he is more tied to the chains of absolute causality and in all likelihood has more difficulties breaking free of it than anyone else. view post


I am a devout follower of Kellhus posted 15 December 2009 in The Judging EyeI am a devout follower of Kellhus by Callan S., Auditor

I'm saying Kellhus is blind to the emotions that drive him - that he recognises emotions that no longer drive him is both true yet wont mean anything in terms of recognising what emotions actually do drive him.

And in terms of free will the question I raise is 'Free of what?'. If your causally linked to things you care about - do you want to be free of things you care about? I address this more on my blog: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://philosophergamer.blogspot.com/2009/11/free-will-looking-further.html">http://philosophergamer.blogspot.com/20 ... rther.html</a><!-- m --> view post


I am a devout follower of Kellhus posted 16 December 2009 in The Judging EyeI am a devout follower of Kellhus by Thorsten, Candidate

And in terms of free will the question I raise is 'Free of what?'. If your causally linked to things you care about - do you want to be free of things you care about? I address this more on my blog: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://philosophergamer.blogspot.com/20">http://philosophergamer.blogspot.com/20</a><!-- m --> ... rther.html


Well, this goes to the heart of the free will issue - what does it actually mean to exercise free will? Can you (or anyone) think of an experiment (even a thought experiment) that could in principle prove the existence of free will in contrast to determinism? I've been trying to come up with something for years, and I think it's just not possible.

Free will is not just the opposite of causality (that's randomness in a sense, completely random events appear uncaused by external factors and hence are unpredictable) - it's something different, something rather complicatedly different. Language knows that - we call a strong-willed person also a determined person. We would not call a person who throws dice for decisionmaking free-willed.

The keyword would be something like self-determination - but what does that mean? Obviously, you are determined by what you want because if it were different, you wouldn't want it. Of course, the neuroscientists go on claiming that self is an illusion (which does not prevent them from feeling pissed when their papers are rejected - that seems real enough for them). But as I wrote elsewhere, there is a blatant contradiction that if there is no self, the whole scientific method which is validated by the experience of the self, the conscious observer, is as illusionary as the self, and so it can't be used to disprove any self. view post


The Judging Eye cover art / edition posted 17 December 2009 in The Judging EyeThe Judging Eye cover art / edition by Almighty Tallest, Candidate

This is the one I have:

[img:2vxzthiy]http&#58;//3&#46;bp&#46;blogspot&#46;com/_YhrLAYLQ8So/SVZi59VDmaI/AAAAAAAAHVE/LACGqSEpg-s/s400/The+Judging+Eye+Canada&#46;jpg[/img:2vxzthiy]

I'm with you, though. I prefer sets of books to all have the same style of cover. It's a purely OCD thing with me, I like to be able to glance at my shelves and see obvious groupings of book series. I like the cover I have, though, and hope that the rest of this second series follows suit. view post


Scott bakker interview posted 12 January 2010 in Author Q &amp; AScott bakker interview by avatar_of_existence, Peralogue

there's a point when Achamian says to Proyas in the first book that he 'when you are certain you are certain to be decieved'. I think you can feel like you know something, but to feel like that knowledge is immutable and unchanging, that it is absolute, well it probably won't make you a happy person, nor will it make those around you happy unless they share your absolutes (think Ayn Rand Objectivist here). Also, it makes it a lot easier to be a judgmental asshole, which I think was Bakker's point. It works for me anyway, keeps me from getting too angry at anyone for anything they've done. view post


Sorcery and its parallels in our world posted 12 January 2010 in The Thousandfold ThoughtSorcery and its parallels in our world by avatar_of_existence, Peralogue

I have been having a very intense and long-lasting conversation with four friends who are fans of the PON series concerning the nature of sorcery and its parallels in our society. Having just finished reading Authority: Construction and Corrosion by Bruce Lincoln (I think) I was struck by similarities to the definition of sorcery in TTT. Authority is defined in the book as consequential speech, empowered or corroded by social position, place, and timing. A friend of mine thinks that poetry is a more direct parallel despite Achamian basically stating that they are opposites (can't remember which book but I'm pretty sure he did say they were opposite in that sorcrey destroys and poetry creates). Then the conversation turned to language itself. A philosophy teacher said that a good philosopher 'is interested in what words can and should do for us.' which, frankly, blew my mind. This all turns to sorcery, the idea of utteral and inutteral perhaps referring directly to the fact that what those in power (think the president or the head of a big advertising company) say and what we intend to make real happen to often be two very different things (I admit this correlation is weak). I suppose what excites me about this is that it means that one day I can practice sorcery in a metaphorical sense, though I can see how it could quite literally cost me my soul (become the president? Hah!). Anyone have any ideas of what sorcery could be in our world? Of how else we shape the world with our words? view post


Sorcery and its parallels in our world posted 12 January 2010 in The Thousandfold ThoughtSorcery and its parallels in our world by Athjeari, Peralogue

I too have thought of the power of sorcery in a way that correlates with our world.
This being said, I am a student/teacher of communication studies and I study rhetoric and theory. I believed that words had power prior to reading PON, but I like the way in which words are used within the universe of PON to generate power/control.

With most characters in the series, the most potent tool used to control and gain power is rhetoric. Granted, Cnaiur and Kellhus demonstrate incredible martial prowess (which could honestly be viewed as a form of rhetoric), but Kellhus, and Cnaiur, use words in order to dominate and control others for the most part.
Look at the way Cnaiur culled Serwe into submission by whispering to her. Look at the way Cnaiur rallied his men in there desperate attempt to hold the city towards the end of TTT. Another example is Cnaiur talking to the caste nobles in the Andiamine Heights.
I shouldn't even have to give examples of Kellhus, but the scene with Leweth, the trapper, is one of my favorite scenes. Kellhus admits he uses words Leweth calls cruel solely to better possess him, but any instance that Kellhus utters words can be seen as using rhetoric for power and control. I like to look at these characters: Kellhus, Cnaiur, Conphas (Conphas talks about the importance of kairos, which is Greek for referring to waiting for the correct moment or timing, which I love), Esmenet (She is great because Esmenet is a women and watching her rise to power through the use of words, and sex, is wonderful in a world dominated by men), Maithanet, and last but not least Moenghus (the dialogue in TTT with Kellhus is spectacular, and I often look at the exchange as a legitimate fight for control with two Dunyain trying to anticipate and direct the other Dunyain solely with the use of words (until Kellhus stabs Moenghus of course). I enjoy the use of words by these characters more so than looking at the sorcerers, but I have definitely thought about exactly what you stated regarding the use of words by sorcerers.

This brings me to the sorcerers of the Three Seas. Sorcerers wield unimaginable power through the use of words. The book shows men pulling walls down solely with words. I also think it is important to bring up that for the most part Bakker refers to sorcerers as &quot;singing&quot; and this, I think, is unique and powerful as well with regards to the meaning behind the words and how they are spoken (delivery if you would, some individuals are FAR better at delivery and know exactly how to speak to instill emotions and provoke action from people.

As a student of rhetoric and communication studies, I like to think that words DO possess this power within our world, as long as you are in the right position or place for your words to be heard, and you speak at the right time (kairos). The examples of CEO's and the President work great, but like I said above, I tend to focus my attention on the actual dialogue within the PON series. view post


The White-Luck Warrior (Book #2) posted 18 January 2010 in The Great Ordeal [supposed]The White-Luck Warrior (Book #2) by Madness, Peralogue

Amazon.co.uk has it listed as March 3/2011, unfortunately. I wanted to read it this year. Apparently, after that release date it will be nothing but Earwa books until the Second Apocalypse is done.

On a another cool note, amazon.co.uk has Disciple of the Dog, for those of you still paying attention, for September 10/2010. It'll make a cool birthday present for me. view post


Sorcery and its parallels in our world posted 25 January 2010 in The Thousandfold ThoughtSorcery and its parallels in our world by avatar_of_existence, Peralogue

I like the part about the sorcerers singing. I guess what I was most interested in is how we practice sorcery (speaking words that shape the world) today, and what those words are. So are singers sorcerers? Its hard to measure the ability to shape the world without something as direct as the

  • odaini concussion chant
  • to give it context, and so I don't even know how to answer the question. Advertising seems the closest to sorcery in the end, and musicians are only magical in that they have good advertising
  • (like Madonna or the late Micheal Jackson). I watched an old BBC documentary called 'Century of the Self' yesterday that kind of solidified that opinion. <!-- s:shock: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_eek.gif" alt=":shock:" title="Shocked" /><!-- s:shock: --> view post


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