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Now Reading... posted 14 March 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Wil, Head Moderator

I thought it would be nice to have a place for members to lett other members know what they are reading and what they think of it. Let's try and keep this spoiler-free.


I am about 250 pages into Gardens of the Moon by Steven Erikson and I am loving it. A must-read (although I'm sure that most on here have read this already). I like the fact that (so far) he hasn't sat down and explained anything, that you have to learn about the world. view post


Now Reading... posted 14 March 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Malarion, Candidate

GOTM is a great book. It gets better as it progresses (and I keep going back to it to reread certain scenes).

Presently reading Erikson's latest Malazan book, "Midnight Tides", which is now building up nicely (nearly finished). Its not his best (book 3 is, imho), but its still better than most fantasy out there. Great info galore in this book. Its heavy in exposition and I'm loving it (who said expocition was a bad thing). view post


World-building posted 14 March 2004 in Writing TipsWorld-building by Malarion, Candidate

I think the only way to get the right map is to draw one, work on it, think about your story, and decide where this map works against it. Once you have done this, redraw it, go through the same procedure and keep repeating it. Its unlikely you'll get it right first time (or second etc), but its necessary.

Also, before your start right down all the conditions you require for your map (key cities, countires, areas for potential battles etc). This will help guide you. And never complete it entirely. Allow blanks. You'll need the freedom to expand when you get writing.

As for getting the geography right...

Thats a hard one. How hard depends on the scale of your map. If you're drawing the whole world then its a difficult problem. If its just an area then the task is a little easier. Perhaps the best start is to work out the direction of the prevailing rains. From there you should be able to work out what areas are wet and what are dry etc.

Hope this helps. view post


More laudations... this time from a very important group posted 14 March 2004 in Interviews and ReviewsMore laudations... this time from a very important group by Malarion, Candidate

A fantastic result for a first book. Bakker is on his way to joining Erikson and Martin (and deservedly so, imho). view post


Great News - and please post what work you are all doing. posted 15 March 2004 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Malarion, Candidate

Just thought I'd say thanks. I hope to post some of my stuff once you free this section up (and a brilliant choice for the method of posting - I hate it when its pasted onto the forum). Hope we get something going with this, and I'll give what help I can (and hopefully Bakker can lend us his wisdom <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> ).

I've written 43 chapters of my first book (still being editted) and I'm on the 10th of book 2. Book 1 (like most fantasy these days) is only the first part of my tale.

Book 1 - "A Faceless Shadow"
Book 2 - "Champions of Carnage" view post


Great News - and please post what work you are all doing. posted 15 March 2004 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Champions of Carnage seems a bit heavy. That was just my initial reaction, anyway. I like it, but think that some people could be a bit turned off by it. view post


Great News - and please post what work you are all doing. posted 16 March 2004 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Malarion, Candidate

Hehe.

Doubtlessly if I somehow convince someone into publishing these stories the publisher will decide the titles for me aka LOTR's trilogy.

Its a working title and might (like everything else) change.

Anyway, who else is writing something and what's it called? view post


Great News - and please post what work you are all doing. posted 16 March 2004 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Wil, Head Moderator

I have some stuff going, but I can never think of a good title. *sigh* of course I can never get past the first ten pages... view post


Now Reading... posted 16 March 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Clarkesworld Books, Peralogue

I'm currently reading Neil Gaiman's Adventures in the Dream Trade and just finished Tim Lebbon's Changing of Faces. CoF is a followup to the Naming of Parts novella and is every bit as good. If you like horror, Lebbon is a writer you need to check out.

-Neil view post


Now Reading... posted 16 March 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Voland, Candidate

Currently reading Carter beats the Devil by Glen David Gold, as well as Liveship Traders by Robin Hobb.
Struggling a bit with Liveship but I want to finish that trilogy before I move on to the Golden Fool. view post


Now Reading... posted 16 March 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I just started The Fencing Master, which is not fantasy at all, but oh well.

Voland, how are you struggling with the Liveship Traders? Are you having problems getting into the plot, or following the story, or what? I'm just curious, because I think they might be my favorite works RH has done. I would like to hear your opinion. view post


Welcome and Guidelines posted 18 March 2004 in Member Written WorksWelcome and Guidelines by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Well, after a rather bumpy ride we got the attachment function working. This forum is now unlocked and open for business. Please, begin posting your writing and become better authors. Sorry about the few days of downtime. view post


Now Reading... posted 18 March 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by LooseCannon, Peralogue

I had the same problem with Liveship Traders. I read it off and on for a month and finally gave up. I just couldn't get interested in the so-so plot. I am sure I will eventually return to it at some point.

Also, I have been struggling to get into Otherland: The Mountain of Black Glass. Just don't have the time I need at the moment to read so it is hard to get into books, I guess. Been about eight months since I read the previous novel in the Otherland series.

Just finished Midnight Tides about two weeks ago (no trouble getting into this one!), and as Mal said, it was very good although MoI is probably still the best in the series. Erikson's series is definately at the top of the genre right now. Of course Bakker's series is looking like it might take a run for the title if the first book is any indication <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) -->. view post


The Series That Comes After? posted 18 March 2004 in Author Q &amp; AThe Series That Comes After? by LooseCannon, Peralogue

Hi Scott, I was just wondering what your plans are after you finish the PoN series? Are you planning to stick to the basic fantasy genre or are you going to delve into other stuff? If so can you give us any indication on what we might be in for later on down the line? view post


kellhus == good guy?? posted 18 March 2004 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by LooseCannon, Peralogue

@Sovin and Mal - He does indeed say he is on his way to kill his father, but he says it to Nauir and we are reading from Nauir's POV at that moment. So, you probably have a valid point there as I don't think Kellhus actually thinks to himself about killing his father anywhere else in the books. Regardless I am unsure if he will be able to kill his father. I imagine some sort of Darth Vader/Luke Skywalker encounter in the WP <!-- s;) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=";)" title="Wink" /><!-- s;) -->. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 18 March 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Replay, Auditor

I would have to say yes, all morality is just a social construct. However, that doesn't demean it in any way, to my thinking.


I think this is quite a common argument made by many these days, and it is very easy to see how people come to such a conclusion.

The problem comes when you try to lump all of morality (or value which morality is an extension of), into one group. Whereas in reality is does not really work like that.

By looking at morality from only a social point of view, you miss the morality/value of the intellect. And if you look at it from only an intellectual point a view, you can miss the social (and then theres the biological and inorganic etc).

For instance, theres been talk of whether animals have morality/value. Well, from an intellectual--and to a smaller extent, social--it may seem that they dont. But from a biological? Well thats another matter. Does not an animal do all it can to survive? And are not those who do survive those of biological higher value? I guess you could say that is what the whole survival of the fittest is about (though perhaps a better name would be survival of the best, or even survival of the highest value).

From this i guess you could say that evolution is just a movement to higher forms of value. Which brings up and interesting point, and that is that value is not a fixed thing (well, in the relative world anyway). I suppose this is the cause of most of the problems when you try to define it (i certainly had a lot of problems just typing out this small post on the subject). view post


Pantoum posted 18 March 2004 in Member Written WorksPantoum by Wil, Head Moderator

I thought that I would start this out by putting one of my poems that I have written recently on here. It dosen't have a title, and it is written in the pantoum style. view post


The Series That Comes After? posted 18 March 2004 in Author Q &amp; AThe Series That Comes After? by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Ah, the question I've been dreading. In the first few months of 2003 I took some time out to write a sleek little near-future psychothriller called Neuropath, which I intend to buff and polish once I finish TTT. I started NP thinking I needed a break from writing fantasy, only to discover that fantasy writing is, well... So much more damn fun!

So NP is next, hot on the heels of TTT. What comes after NP?

The Aspect-Emperor, another trilogy which returns to the demented cast (those that survive, that is) of PON some twenty years later. More than a few people groan when I say this, which is why I always feel the need to explain myself! First, I conceived and roughed out the greater cycle of stories (as a trilogy of trilogies) the year before WoT came out, so this is most definitely not a case of me slavishly following commercial precedents. This means, secondly, that every book in the series is motivated by STORY, and not money (if there is any in this business!) Third, PON is a complete tale, and not merely the first third of one. The relationship of AE to PON is more akin to the relationship between the Dune books, though the narrative arc that binds them - the story of the Second Apocalypse - is, I like to think, less ad hoc than Herbert's.

As strange as it sounds, I look at PON as my version of The Hobbit. view post


kellhus == good guy?? posted 18 March 2004 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I think the only information about Kellhus we can assume to be true is that which comes from his POV. view post


The Series That Comes After? posted 18 March 2004 in Author Q &amp; AThe Series That Comes After? by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

That is very exciting, to think about the relationship between The Hobbit and LoTR and then apply that to what we are reading now.

Scott, have you read any of the Farseer, Liveship Trader, or Tawny Man trilogies by Robin Hobb? They follow the cycle of trilogies format, and I really like it.

It is also exciting to think about this website ten years down the road, with a huge member base and tons of forums. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 18 March 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Welcome to the board, Replay.

Yes, morality and value would be a changing concept. I am arguing that from where morality is derived is irrelevant. We must acknowledge it as a necessary facet of life. It smooths out human interaction and gives members of a society a common frame of reference. But, by acknowledging that morality is not a concrete system, we can liberate ourselves from the who's right/wrong argument and acknowledge differing moral beliefs as personal problems and not religious. view post


The Series That Comes After? posted 18 March 2004 in Author Q &amp; AThe Series That Comes After? by Arakasi, Commoner

Yeah I was curious about that as well. I've sort of got used to the idea that an author tends to stay in one world. It seems all the major fantasy writers are doing it these days. Like Erikson, Martin, Jordan, etc. It's funny to hear the first book (and series) referred to as the hobbit though. *lol* But that is cool since I'll be able to read more from this interesting world. view post


Few Questions posted 18 March 2004 in Author Q &amp; AFew Questions by Arakasi, Commoner

I just have a couple questions on the books here. I enjoyed the first one a lot and will likely do a reread before the second book comes in. Anyways to my questions.

1. I read that you're going to do three triologies set in the same world. But at the same time you're going to have each wrap up. Does this mean mostly wrap up, because if you do a complete wrap up like most authors do, wouldn't it be hard to start again in the same world in only 20 years?

2. Are you going to explore more of the world? Or is the continent we see on the map the only one. Or will you go over the seas so to speak. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 18 March 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Replay, Auditor

Yes, the i-am-right-you-are-wrong attitude is one of biggest causes of problems in the world today. But people love to set ideas and truths in concrete and cling on to them. I guess its a way to try and fend off the uncertainty of the world.

The thing is though, its in that uncertainty that true learning comes. Knowing that you can never have all the facts and that logic is not infallible, you can easily accept that what you hold true now, may not be so. You are not only open to any new information that comes along, but also open to the wonder of the world as it unfolds, instead of trying to force it into something else (which in the end never works).

p.s. I dont really agree with you that this is not a religious issue. This topic is at the very heart of religion. But then yours and my idea of what religion is probably differs quite a bit. view post


The Series That Comes After? posted 18 March 2004 in Author Q &amp; AThe Series That Comes After? by LooseCannon, Peralogue

Interesting response! Not sure what to make of the comparison to the Hobbit. Are you implying that the next trilogy will focus on an even more epic plotline than the current one and that PON is just an introductory story into this world? That boggles my tiny little mind if that is the case. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 18 March 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

What I mean by not a religious issue is that by accepting that we don't have the absolute truth we can allow other religions or lack of religion to exist peacefully without the need to "make them see the truth." I am not saying that these are not religious beliefs, but I see how that was unclear in my last post, sorry. view post


Administrator Vacation posted 18 March 2004 in General AnnouncementsAdministrator Vacation by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Wil and I, the founders and admins of this site, will both be gone to different places in Mexico with our families over spring break. This being the case, if anything goes horribly wrong or falls apart we won't be hear to deal with it. Hopefully everything will be smooth sailing, and I at least will do what I can to log in from Mexico at a cyber cafe or some similar location.

We should both be back Saturday the 27 of March. view post


On The Warrior Prophet posted 18 March 2004 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Replay, Auditor

Ah i see what you mean. Yes, that has been a problem with alot of religions over the years (not all though), and it is probably one of the major causes for people turning away from it. It certainly turned me away from Christianty, what with all the dogma and asking you to accept their word as law just on faith.

Funny thing is, it was that turning away and looking at other religions that finally allow me to understand Christianity alot better. It's not all that bad a religion once you cut away most of the crap (if your interested, you might want to check out some of stuff by the Christian mystics on the web). Plus from speaking to a couple of Christians lately, i think things are changing. They didnt seem so interested following the dogma layed out for them, and instead were investigating reality for themselves (or getting in contact with face of god as they like to call it). Guess that's that evolution at work again. view post


Now Reading... posted 19 March 2004 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Voland, Candidate

I can't really say. I'm having some trouble with the ...gah, what's his name...the boy on the Vivacia, something with W iirc...storyline. Maybe I'm just afraid for him, since RH wasn't very nice to poor Fitz <!-- s:D --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- s:D -->. I'll get around to it eventually, I like the book. view post


Few Questions posted 19 March 2004 in Author Q &amp; AFew Questions by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Hi Akrasi. The stories are nested within a greater narrative. What I mean is that each trilogy (as opposed to each book within the trilogy) will have a complete story to tell. At the same time, each trilogy will also tell part of a much, much larger story. Though most everything happens within Earwa, so things do spill in from the outside.

I actually think 'global world-building' is something of a mistake in creating fantasy worlds. One of the primary features of ancient understandings of the world, I think, is the incompleteness of that understanding. This is one of the things Tolkien does so well - even in the name 'Middle-earth': he conjures the sense of civilization encircled by mystery and darkness. view post


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